Memo for open source online educational content contributors

 

To: Contributors to open source education

 

From: Salie Davis, open source designer for online education

 

Subject: Accessibility Design

 

Accessibility goes beyond disability; I prefer to interpret it as being based on ability. I say this because everyone has a different level of ability. When designing open source content you may not have the time or resources to design for all levels of ability possible, however designing for as much flexibility in the content plan to accommodate the widest range of abilities is good design planning.

Not all users of open source educational resources will publicly identify with having a disability, hence you may hear the terms “invisible disabilities” and “visible disabilities”.  Especially with online open source education, you may never “see” the user of the content or even have the opportunity to interact on a personal level with the content consumer. We cannot assume what will work and what will not work for any given ability based on our own presumptions by what we observe.

The best alternative that I see is to offer design choices that the student and/ or consumer of open source educational modules can adopt independently. Allow them to choose font type, contrast, color, sound options, volume, closed caption options, etc.  Although many personal computers have these functions available, designing the educational platform so that they work in conjunction with and do not interfere with these personal choices is a first and essential step.

Please educate yourself using the resource below.

Thank you,

Salie Davis

Resources

Accessibility Matters, MOOC  http://accessmooc.weebly.com/team-bios.html

 

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Forest Exploration and Stewardship

gott_curriculm_2016 Click to download the curriculum PDF or see below

Amberosity Gott
Forests as Classrooms
Forest Exploration and Stewardship
Target Audience:
My target audience are students ages 4-7. This age group is in the pre-operational stage.
They are still very egocentric. Children at this age are very hands-on and need to try things out
for themselves in order to learn. They may have a short attention span if activities are not handson
or active play. Symbolic play, roleplaying or pretend play is important and generally well
received at this age. Children at the mid to later ages in this range are starting to perceive some
different between real and pretend. They may be able to make basic connections between what
they are pretending and how it relates to the real world.
I have taken the above information and my own knowledge of how my two boys (ages 4
and 2.5 years old) interact and learn to craft this lesson plan. I focused on the activities being
driven by student observations and guided by some basic questions from the teachers. I also
focused on ways to spark their interest and have them create personal connections to larger ideas
such as environmental stewardship and forest products. In my experience, children at these ages
greatly enjoy being able to share and teach the adults around them. Thus, discussions of the
lesson material that incorporates their observations will help engage students and keep them
interested. Students at this age also like to be able to pretend, explore and stay active. Activities
that promote imagination, movement and supervised exploration are ideal. This curriculum also
focuses on a lot of art-based play where students are in charge of drawing based on observations.
Applicable Learning Theories
This curriculum is designed to meet early childhood learning standards while still allowing students the flexibility to explore individual interests. It follows several of Humanism’s principles in that it allows students to explore what interests them under the facilitation of a teacher. The ongoing journal project is an example of this. Students are free to journal about what interests them in the context of the forest subject but are also guided by broad questions from the teacher. Another example of flexibility for student’s interests in this curriculum is the Environmental Stewardship 101 activity which serves as a jumping board for students to explore environmental stewardship topics that interest them. Students are challenged to choose an environmental stewardship activity that engages and inspires them and then to educate others about that activity.
This curriculum also uses principles from Constructivism. Throughout these activities students are asked to actively take their observation and new knowledge and make connections with what they already know. In several activities students are asked to connect what they are learning to their daily lives. For example, students are asked to brainstorm what forest products they already use and then bring in a forest product from home. This provides a pathway of understanding of why we need to protect forests and the important role they play in our lives using what students already know. Students are also encouraged throughout their journaling to improve, revise question and make new conclusions based on what they are learning and already know.
Learning Objectives
Creative Arts:
* (Knowledge Level) identify shapes, textures, and colors in forest objects and their own art
* (Comprehension Level) describe primarily through sketches or drawings 1-2 species they see in the forest
* (Application Level) experiment with colors, shapes, and materials to more accurately render their drawings of forest species
* (Application Level) produce sketches and drawings of forest species using a variety of art materials and accurate coloration/shape
* (Analysis Level) examine available materials on forest species and use those materials to inform their own drawings
Science:
* (Knowledge Level) describe the physical properties of forests, plants, and animals
* (Knowledge Level) describe what type of home these animals live in.
* (Knowledge Level) describe 1 rudimentary forest relationship
* (Knowledge Level) list 3 animal species that make their homes in the forest
* (Knowledge Level) identify an animal is a bird, mammal, reptile or amphibian
* (Comprehension Level) discuss why we need to protect forest habitat
* (Comprehension Level) identify 3 animal species that live in the forest from video, pictures or personal sightings
* (Comprehension Level) discuss changes that occur in the forest environment
* (Comprehension Level) explain what animals need to make a home in the forest; food, water, cover, and materials
* (Comprehension Level) describe through discussion, writing, or drawing 2-3 characteristics of a chosen species from the forest
* (Application Level) demonstrate the ability to independently observe, collect, describe and record information about forest habitat
* (Analysis Level) categorize items from the forest by color, species, shape, or other physical characteristics
* (Analysis Level) compare aspects of their lives to the lives of animals in the forest
Social Studies:
* (Knowledge Level) identify forest products outside the forest setting
* (Comprehension Level) describe 1 behavior they can do to help protect the environment
* (Comprehension Level) identify 1 career or job that is important to forest health
* (Application Level) apply knowledge of environmental practices and responsible behaviors to some aspect of their own lives
* (Analysis Level) explain how their actions contribute to forest and local ecosystem health
* (Synthesis Level) create an accurate map of a forest landscape using class observations
Learning Experiences and Instruction
Lesson One:
Stage One:
Established Goals:
Creative Arts:
– Uses different art media and materials
– Identifies shapes, textures, and colors
Science:
– Knows that plants and animals need food, sun, air and water to survive (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
– Observes and discusses changes that occur in their world [e.g., plant growth, colors of foliage, stages of living things (caterpillar/butterfly), night and day, seasons, weather, a new building in the community] (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
– Demonstrates curiosity about the natural environment (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
– Asks questions and proposes ways to answer them (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
– Shows interest in and discovers relationships and patterns (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
– Observes and describes the physical properties of objects (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
– Sorts living things by characteristics such as movement, environment or body covering (e.g., hair, feathers, scales) (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
– Develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means including observation, discussion, drawings, maps, and charts (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
– Makes generalizations or conclusions based on experiences (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
Understandings (from Bloom’s Taxonomy):
* (Knowledge Level) describe the physical properties of forests, plants, and animals
* (Knowledge Level) describe what type of home these animals live in.
* (Knowledge Level) list 3 animal species that make their homes in the forest
* (Knowledge Level) identify an animal is a bird, mammal, reptile or amphibian
* (Knowledge Level) describe 1 rudimentary forest relationship
* (Knowledge Level) identify shapes, textures, and colors in forest objects and their own art
* (Comprehension Level) describe primarily through sketches or drawings 1-2 species they see in the forest
* (Comprehension Level) identify 3 animal species that live in the forest from video, pictures or personal sightings
* (Comprehension Level) discuss changes that occur in the forest environment
* (Comprehension Level) explain what animals need to make a home in the forest; food, water, cover, and materials
* (Comprehension Level) describe through discussion, writing, or drawing 2-3 characteristics of a chosen species from the forest.
* (Application Level) demonstrate the ability to independently observe, collect, describe and record information about forest habitat
* (Application Level) experiment with colors, shapes, and materials to more accurately render their drawings of forest species
* (Application Level) produce sketches and drawings of forest species using a variety of art materials and accurate coloration/shape
* (Analysis Level) categorize items from the forest by color, species, shape, or other physical characteristics
* (Analysis Level) examine available materials on forest species and use those materials to inform their own drawings
* (Analysis Level) compare aspects of their lives to the lives of animals in the forest
Students will know…
 2-3 species that live in Maine forests and how to identify these species.
 Animals use resources from forests to make their homes.
 Animals have specific adaptations that allow them to live in different habitats.
 Animals have different characteristics that place them into the categories of mammal, bird, reptile and amphibian
Essential Questions:
 What types of animals live in a forest?
 What do animals need to live in a forest?
 What characteristics do animals that live in forests have? How do these characteristics help them survive in forests?
 What does a forest habitat look like? Where do animals live in this habitat?
Students will be able to…
 Make observations and sort objects into categories using physical characteristics
 Identify that an animal is a bird, mammal, reptile or amphibian based on clear characteristics
 Create drawings in the field that they can use to later identify the type of animal or plant seen
 Identify 2-3 forest plant or animal species based on physical characteristics; at least one of these should be a plant species
Stage 2: Assessment Evidence
Performance Tasks:
– Students in the classroom or in the forest setting will be asked to list and/or identify species that are native to the Maine forest. This may take the form of on-site identification of species in the forest setting. This could also be incorporated in the classroom or forest through a scavenger hunt game where they must find and identify pictures in cases of lack of access to forest areas or bad weather.
– Students will create a journal of their experiences in the forest or discuss their experiences with a focus on; questions they have, answers to those questions based on their observations, observations of the physical properties of projects, observations of changes in the forest, drawings, and maps.
– Students will describe 1 rudimentary forest relationship in some detail (e.g. the chipmunk makes his home in the pine tree and gather pinecones from it for food) either in a class discussion or in their journal
Other Evidence:
– Students are able to make personal connections and observations about the forest
– Contributions to class discussions about animal species, habitat and forest ecosystems/communities
– Students are able to compare forest objects and species using their physical characteristics
Stage 3: Learning Plan
Field Trip: Forest Exploration for Journaling and Observations
** This activity allows teachers and students to establish a forest journal which they are strongly encouraged to continue throughout the curriculum.
 Students should understand basic forest safety rules such as staying with the group, not disturbing plants or wildlife, not approaching or feeding wildlife, and leave no trace principles.
 Students should have some introductory knowledge of forest animals, characteristics and adaptations before taking the field trip.
 Teachers should choose a list of species for students to focus on before the field trip. Students should also be encouraged to identify or study any other species of animals or plants they wish beyond this list.
Species suggestions:
 Eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis)
 Eastern chipmunk (Tamias striatus)
 White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus)
 Black bear (Ursus americanus)
 Northern raccoon (Procyon lotor)
 Red fox (Vulpes vulpes)
 Snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus)
 American deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus)
 Yellow bellied sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius)
 Downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)
 Hairy woodpecker (Picoides villosus)
 Blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata)
 Black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)
 American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)
Materials and Preparation:
 Teachers will need to identify a local forest setting suitable for children to walk through. The setting should be a good representation of a Maine forest with areas suitable for children to spend time journaling. The forest should also ideally have prominent signs of animal inhabitants.
 Journaling materials (Notebook with white or lined paper, pencils, crayons, markers etc.)
 Laminated photos of animal species (in case they are not sighted)
 Appropiate outdoor wear for each child (jackets, sneakers)
 Field guides
Activity:
 Once at the site have children pair into groups of 2-3.
 Have students explore the site within preset boundaries with their groups
o Students should be looking for animals or signs of animals
o Questions to answer:
 What do animals need to survive in the forest?
 What signs do animals leave behind?
 Where would you live if you were a forest animal?
 What does a forest habitat look like? Where do animals live in this habitat?
 Have students regroup and share their observations. Discuss answers to the questions above.
 Lead a class exploration of the site. Use combination of laminated photos, signs of animals (scat, food remains, tracks, holes or burrows) and student observations to discuss each animal species, their homes and adaptations.
o Questions to answer:
 What types of adaptations does this animal need to live in this type of home? (e.g. The chipmunk has pouch cheeks to carry food to its home, the woodpeckers beak is long and pointed so it can grab bugs from the holes it pecks in trees)
 What signs does this animal leave behind?
 Ideally while still at the site assign each student an area to sit within the forest and give students 10-30 minutes (depending on age and time available) to journal their observations. Journals can include written or drawn observations, poems, drawing of species or signs of species they saw etc.…
o Assist students with writing the date, time, and weather somewhere in their journal entry
o If time is not available at the site have students complete their journals as soon as possible within the classroom.
o For very young students it may be best to have them sit as a group within the forest to journal.
Prompts for Journaling After the Field Trip and in the Classroom:
 Describe or draw a local species and their home
 Describe where and how you would live if you were a forest animal
 Provide forest objects for students to sketch in detail
 Write down questions for later exploration/study
 What is changing or has changed in the forest?
 Describe a forest relationship (e.g. the chipmunks live in the pine tree and eat the cones)
Activity: Sort and Match
 Students should have a basic knowledge of shapes and colors
 This activity can be used as an introduction to species, difference between species and observations. It can also be used after students have a working knowledge of forest species to assess their knowledge and observational abilities.
Materials and Preparation:
 Forest materials to sort and match; leaves or varying colors and species, sticks, rocks, bark etc.… Materials can be gathered by the teacher or by the students during the field trip. Be sure that gathering of materials is done in accordance with local laws, done sustainably and that they will not decompose before the activity is done (e.g. no live plants, insects etc.…)
 If students have background knowledge of some plant species this is helpful but not necessary to the activity.
 Each student or groups of students should have a clear table to sort items
 Students should also have a way to label and identify their created categories. This could be labels or bins to contain items.
 Fields guides and/or pictures of local species to aid students in sorting
 Camera to take photos if activity gets cut short or you want to have a visual reference for students later on
 Teachers can choose how difficult or easy to make the sorting based on their class (e.g. a teacher may only distribute red, yellow and green leaves to a pre-school class, while a 1st grade class may have several types of sticks that match to the species of tree leaf)
Activity:
 As a class have students make observations about the items.
o Questions to answer:
 What color is it?
 What shapes do you see?
 Do you recognize what species this is from?
 Is it hard? Soft? Rough? Smooth?
 Distribute the objects to individual students or groups. If using groups, it is advised they do not exceed 3 students.
 Give the class 10-15 minutes to sort the objects into categories. If needed assist students in labeling their categories. Allow students to use field guides and other identification materials if they like.
 Have students or groups explain to the class their categories and what characteristics they used to sort.
 If time allows, have students brainstorm other ways they could sort their objects
RESOURCES:
TV Show:‘Curious George’ “Curious George and the Dam Builders” Season 1 Ep. 15
TV Show:‘Curious George’ “Curious George and the Dam Builders” Season 1 Ep. 15
Book: ‘The Sibley Guide to Birds’ – David Allen Sibley
Book: ‘Forest Trees of Maine’ – Maine Forest Service (Available for free online in PDF format from; http://maine.gov/dacf/mfs/publications/handbooks_guides/forest_trees/index.html )
Book: ‘Peterson Field Guide to Mammals of North America’ – Fiona Reid
Lesson Two:
Stage One:
Established Goals:
Creative Arts:
 Uses different art media and materials
 Identifies shapes, textures, and colors
Science:
 Expands knowledge of and respect for their environment (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
 Develops growing abilities to collect, describe, and record information through a variety of means including observation, discussion, drawings, maps, and charts (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
 Demonstrates curiosity about the natural environment (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
 Observes and describes the physical properties of objects (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
Social Studies
 Understands and discusses why certain responsibilities are important (e.g., cleaning up, caring for pets) (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
 Notices and expresses interest in different careers and workers’ roles (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
 Demonstrates interest in simple maps and other visuals to describe geographic location, direction, distance, size, and shape (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
 Demonstrates awareness of the need to protect the natural environment (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
 Knows and discusses where some products come from (State of Maine Early Childhood Learning Guidelines)
Understandings (from Bloom’s Taxonomy):
* (Knowledge Level) identify forest products outside the forest setting
* (Comprehension Level) describe 1 behavior they can do to help protect the environment
* (Comprehension Level) identify 1 career or job that is important to forest health
* (Comprehension Level) discuss why we need to protect forest habitat
* (Application Level) apply knowledge of environmental practices and responsible behaviors to some aspect of their own lives
* (Application Level) demonstrate the ability to independently observe, collect, describe and record information about forest habitat
* (Analysis Level) explain how their actions contribute to forest and local ecosystem health
* (Synthesis Level) create a map using a variety of art materials and class observations
Students will know…
 How to make basic maps using their observations of a landscape
 How these jobs contribute to forest health
 2-3 products that come from the forest
 How their actions impact the environment in the areas of recycling, energy usage, water usage and stewardship
Essential Questions:
 What jobs do people have taking care of or managing forests?
 How do these jobs help keep the forest healthy?
 How can maps help us study forests?
 What do we use that comes from the forest?
Students will be able to…
 Identify 2-3 forest products and discuss how they are obtained or used
 Help design simple maps based on places they have explored or are exploring and are able to use these maps with adult assistance to navigate
 Identify 1 career or job that is important to forest health (park ranger, firefighter, biologist, logger etc.…)
 Identify forest products outside the forest setting (e.g. The Christmas tree in my home comes from the forest)
 Describe 1 behavior they can do to help protect the environment and shows follow-through in doing this behavior (e.g. turning off the light if no one is in the room)
Stage 2: Assessment Evidence
Performance Tasks:
– Students will choose an environmentally conscientious behavior to implement in their daily lives. They will create a visual explanation of that activity and explain it to the
class/their parents. E.G. turning off the lights when they leave the room, turning off the water when they are brushing their teeth, taking showers instead of baths, recycling their homework etc.…
– Students will create a journal of their experiences in the forest or discuss their experiences with a focus on; questions they have, answers to those questions based on their observations, observations of how the forest is affect by humans, questions/observations about forest careers, drawings, and maps.
– Students will work together to design and create a map of a local forest area they visit. This could be located and include an urban area. Students will further use this map to discuss human impacts on forests. (e.g. There is a river next to the road where we saw a lot of trash, that could hurt animals that live there).
Other Evidence:
– Students are able to make personal connections and observations about the forest
– Contributions to class discussions about forest health, forest careers, and environmental stewardship
– Students are able to make connections between items in their home, classroom, town and where they came from in the forest (e.g. I have a wooden train track at home. The wood comes from trees in the forest)
Stage 3: Learning Plan
Activity: Mapping our Forest
** This activity should take place after “Forest Exploration for Journaling and Observations” or ideally a separate field trip should be made to the forest setting.
 Students should have sketches, notes, and observations about their forest setting that will aid them in creating a map
 Students should complete this activity as soon as possible after the field trip to allow for accuracy and/or should make multiple trips to the area to improve and revise their map
 For younger grades (Pre-k and Kindergarten) you can have them assist in designing a basic map or have them draw their own maps and then lead an expedition using their maps on the forest site.
Materials and Preparation:
 Students forest journals from “Forest Exploration for Journaling and Observations”
 Field Guides
 Large piece of paper (May be ideal to mount this on cardboard to allow for mobility and for it to be positioned where everyone in the class can see)
 Art materials for creating the map (crayons, pens, markers, scissors, erasers, paint etc.…)
Activity:
 Have students use their on-site observations to draw rough sketches of a map of the forest area in their journals
 Identify a landmark that students are familiar with and start drawing the map there. It is best to draw a class rough draft on a whiteboard so that edits can easily be made. Have students assist in identifying other landmarks and placing them in the correct areas.
 Once a class rough draft is complete assign each student a landmark or area to work on. (e.g. One student gets the school, another gets a large oak tree with bird nest, another gets the vernal pool). Students should design a drawing or marker that represents their assigned landmark for the map.
 Have students help place their landmarks on the larger map following the draft created earlier.
 If time allows you can have students revise their map after visits to the site, or have them go on an expedition using their map to find a marker you place.
Activity: Humans and Forests: Jobs
 Students should have some basic knowledge of the forest and visited their forest site at least once before this activity.
 Students should be introduced to the idea of forest products before this activity
 Journals are again a useful tool for this activity as students can keep track of ideas, questions or observations about forest careers
 Teachers will need to find and contact those who work in the local forests; Ideally you will be able to set up a classroom or site visit with 2-3 that represent different forest careers.
o Park rangers (National or State)
o Game Wardens
o Biologists
o Firefighters
o Search and Rescue
o Loggers
o Trail crews
o Urban park or forest managers
o Other forest product harvesters (mushrooms, balsam fir tips, flowers, herbs etc.)
Materials and Preparation:
 Dates and times set up with 2-3 speakers with time for students to ask questions
 Supplementary materials for those careers you are unable to get a speaker to represent but still are of interest; videos, pictures, books, props etc.…
 Students forest journals from “Forest Exploration for Journaling and Observations”
 Materials for journaling (pens, markers, crayons etc.…)
Activity:
 Before students meet the speakers have them discuss as a class and/or brainstorm in their journals different forest related jobs.
 Brainstorm as a class forest products and how they relate to student’s daily lives
 Have students bring in one forest product from their home and share where it comes from and what humans use it for
 Have students listen to/visit speakers and encourage questions related to their careers.
 After students listen to each speaker give them time to journal
o What did you find interesting about this job?
o How does this person help the forest? How do they help us?
o What forests products does this person protect or harvest?
 If necessary, introduce supplementary materials on other forest careers to students
 OPTIONAL FOR OLDER STUDENTS: Have students choose one forest career and one forest product that are related. Ask them to spend 30 minutes designing an 8”x11” poster that shows the relationship between this job and the forest product. (e.g. a student may show a trail crew building a trail and then happy hikers hiking it)
Activity: Environmental Stewardship 101
 Students should have some basic knowledge of the forest and visited their forest site at least once before this activity.
 Students should be introduced to the idea of forest products before this activity
 Journals are again a useful tool for this activity as students can keep track of ideas, questions or observations.
 Check with administration about making conservation signs for other parts of the school
 This activity can prequel students independent research into aspect of environmental stewardship
Materials and Preparation:
 Some materials from the resources listed below for students to explore
 A 30-minute TV Show that explains environmental stewardship in an age-appropriate way
 Various cleaned items that can be recycled (tin cans, plastic bags, bottles, cardboard, paper). Best to avoid anything that can decompose but composting can be discussed in addition to this lesson.
 Paper and art materials
 Whiteboard for brainstorming student ideas for energy/water conservation, recycling and other environmentally friendly activities
 Teachers may choose to show a single show or may break up the topics into separate days each with their own relevant video
Activity:
 To introduce this lesson, a kid-friendly video on environmental stewardship should be shown. Some options are listed in resources.
 After the video lead a class discussion
o What do we mean by “recycling”?
o What happens when something is recycled?
o Why do we want to conserve water/energy?
o How does conserving resources help the forest?
 Introduce and explain the slogan “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle” (See the book resource “I Can Save the Earth!: One Little Monster Learns to Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle”)
 Have students brainstorm simple things they can do to help the environment by reducing, reusing or recycling
 Have each student pick an activity they would like to commit to doing for a week or choose an activity as a class to do together
 Have each student draw a poster or sign that they can use at home to help them remember their chosen activity
 Check in with students and remind them to follow through with their activity
 If possible, have students help make signs for the school to promote one conservation activity (e.g. “Last One Out, Lights Out” signs for classrooms etc…)
RESOURCES:
TV Show: ‘The Magic School Bus’ – “Wet All Over” Season 2 Episode 206
TV Show: ‘The Magic School Bus’ – “Family Holiday Special” Season 3 Episode 313
TV Show: ‘Sid the Science Kid’ – “Where Did the Water Go?” Season 2 Episode 51
TV Show: ‘Sid the Science Kid’ – “Clean Air!” Season 2 Episode 52
TV Show: ‘Sid the Science Kid’ – “Reused Robot” Season 2 Episode 53
TV Show: ‘Sid the Science Kid’ – “Save the Stump” Season 2 Episode 54
TV Show: ‘Sid the Science Kid’ – “Let There Be Light” Season 2 Episode 55
TV Show: ‘Curious George’ “Curious George Takes a Hike” Season 2 Ep. 10
TV Show: ‘Curious George’ “Everything Old Is New Again” Season 3 Ep. 7
TV Show: ‘Curious George’ “Follow That Boat” Season 5 Ep. 9
TV Show: ‘Curious George’ “Maple Monkey Madness” Season 6 Ep. 7
TV Show: ‘Curious George’ “Junky Monkey” Season 6 Ep. 10
Book: ‘The Adventures of a Plastic Bottle: A Story About Recycling (Little Green Books)’ – Alison Inches
Book: ‘The Adventures of an Aluminum Can: A Story About Recycling (Little Green Books)’ – Alison Inches
Book: ‘I Can Save the Earth!: One Little Monster Learns to Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle (Little Green Books)’ – Alison Inches
Graphic Organizer
Establishing a Forest Site and Journal
Lesson One
 Field Trip: Forest Exploration for Journaling and Observations
Exploring Forest and Species
 Optional Secondary Field Trip
Lesson One
 Sort and Match
Lesson Two
 Mapping Our Forest
 Continue Journal
Beyond the Forests
Lesson Two
 Humans and Forests: Jobs
 Environmental Stewardship 101
 Continue Journal
Continued Explorations and Study
Based on student interests and time, study based on student’s interests could continue beyond these lessons

Creation of a picture book lesson plan with; PDF format, power point, spreadsheet, and word document resources, as well as three video resources.

The above video gives an overview for teachers and parents

This is the story book read by the author for younger children

This is just the pages to be paused and read individually

Gods little story book about art creation teachers edition in PowerPoint 

You may adapt the PowerPoint for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

final project creation picture book lesson plan word document Salie Davis

You may adapt the document for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

gods little story book about art creation student edition in PDF

You may adapt the PDF for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

Gods little story book about art creation student edition in PowerPoint

You may adapt the PowerPoint for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

Gods little story book about art creation teachers edition in PDFfinal-project-creation-picture-book-lesson-plan-salie-davis

You may adapt the PDF for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

grading sheet for the picture book in spreadsheet format

You may adapt the grading sheet for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

Achieving Your Goal – for children

https://www.mindmeister.com/maps/public_map_shell/797781992/achieving-your-goal-for-children?width=600&height=400&z=auto&presentation=1

Here is a relevant blog post concerning Goal driven learning

Identifying the Goal

These are the steps you would first repeat to the child, then as the child becomes familiar with them you would prompt, “What is the next step?” We will use a cooking example here. Remember to have the child state, “what is my goal.” instead of simply “bake a cake.”

Ask Questions

When identifying a goal it will be important to ask you student questions to challenge the motivation behind their desire to accomplish the goal.

Why

Why is the project based goal being done? In our cooking example it may be. ”

“So I can bake a cake.”

Why is it important?

“It will be my sisters birthday tomorrow.”

Why should people care?

“Everyone will share in the joy and reward of eating a cake made by me for my sister.”

What

What is the Goal? (what you want to achieve)

“to learn to cook a cake.”

Remember to delve deeper in the thought process, I.E. “What are the objectives to the goal?

“To complete the cake in time for my sisters birthday party.”

“what are the challenges or resistance that might be faced?

I have never cooked a cake before.”

What needs to happen and when?

“Read the recipe, gather the ingredients, mix the ingredients, follow the steps, bake the cake, decorate the cake, and eat the cake.”

Who

Who is involved?

“Me My Mom, My Dad, and My sister.”

When

When does this need to be accomplished?

“This afternoon, before tomorrow.”

Where

Identify where the task will take place. “in the kitchen”

How

Make a list of the steps that will be needed to accomplish the goal.

Dream or Goal

step one: Identify the Goal

What is the goal specifically?  An example would be Bake a Cake. Naming the goal helps solidify the commitment to accomplishing the goal.

Step two: Establish a Goal Time Frame.

Is this a long term goal or a short term goal? Create a set time frame for completion, while allowing for some flexibility for learning. In our example the time frame would be 3 hours of instruction time and preparation/ cooking time. This gives ample time for novice students.

Step three. Identify participants in the goal and roles

Who will participate in the accomplishment of this goal?

“Myself, my parents, and my sister”

What will the roles be for those involved?

Mom is the leader. She will instruct and Guide. I will complete the tasks. Dad will evaluate the success of the outcome. My sister will experience a birthday surprise.”

Step Four. List tools and resources needed for the goal.

In the cooking example a list can be created and gathered.

All cooking utensils and equipment needed.

Stove, pots, pot holders, spatulas, bowls, etc.

All food items needed according to the recipe.

Eggs, Milk, flour, coco powder, etc.

Step five. Complete the goal through an activity based lesson.

Help the student achieve their goal through solid goal setting, preparation and guidance through the activity.

Lesson plan preparation

Prior to beginning the task discuss all the steps.

Demonstrate the task either  in person, or via video. Allow the student to ask questions and address concerns before beginning the project.

Prepare the student


Before each goal is decided review goal setting steps through video, charts,, discussions, or other venues.

Before each activity

Review goal setting steps through videos, charts, discussions or other venue.

ChartSMART Smart Goal Setting

ChecklistSMART Smart Goal Setting

Lesson Plan Objectives

When teaching goal setting to children the objective is not simply to teach them how to accomplish the named task. The objective is to teach them the steps for goal setting and goal accomplishment through activity based learning. Hence by naming the steps each time and having the children learn the steps, they are learning how to accomplish any goal.

Methods of evaluation

Self evaluation

Self evaluation: Ask the student to self evaluate.

Did you start on time?

Did you end on time?

Was the project to big, to hard??

Was it to small, to easy?

What did you enjoy?

What steps were you challenged by?

What would you do again?

What would you do differently?

Observational evaluation

Mentor, parent or teacher led observation based on the outcome criteria.

Badging will be awarded by the instructor for learning goal setting.

Peer Evaluation

Peer evaluation based on the goals outcome and/or set feedback guidelines. Peer badges can be awarded for specific goals if done with a larger group of peers through the voting process.

Instructions for the performance play- A STORY OF IDOL WORSHIP AND MURDER

Instructions for the performance play-

A STORY OF IDOL WORSHIP AND MURDER

A PERFORMANCE PALINDROME

BY Salie Davis

Bold face typecharacters, underlined words are part of the Palindrome, *and are the only words that are heard onstage.*

The names of the characters are spoken by the narrator (the character of Jesus Christ) to draw attention to the actions of the characters or before the specific character speaks. Words sometimes represent actions that are part of the palindrome and are also spoken by the narrator. The only words heard on stage are those that are specific to the palindrome. The story is given detail in actions, in select props, in symbolic wardrobe and in lighting that are all dramatized for effect. The only props needed are pews, pedestals, a cross, a bottle of rum and lager, a small cave and a single chair along with different colored robes, different colored body suits, different colored scarves, which represent various sins (the giving out of such can be simplified according to artistic interpretation), a spotted scarf or one with Velcro attached spots, an identifier for Time, such as a clock or staff and a really big fancy woman’s hat. This play would benefit from music. A musical palindrome would enrich it even more so.

Suggested set up for a one act play-

Initially the stage is dark. (Right and left references are facing the stage.) Pews are at the left of the stage in the mid area of the left side. These hold the Dias family and other church members. These people wear grey robes. Under their grey robes are white body suits or robes. God, dressed in a white robe, is positioned at the left of the stage in the rear area of the left side, on the highest pedestal. God is always represented with a capital “G” just as other characters who try to be idol gods are represented with a lower case “g”.

The Narrator (Jesus Christ) is at the left front, off stage at a podium or on the stage at the left front on a pedestal equal to God. Jesus is also referred to in the play as the Red Rose of Sharon. A cross is set behind him. Jesus is dressed in a white robe. His robe may be trimmed in red at the base and sleeves. A crown of thorns may also be used at this same point in the play in which the crucifixion is represented.

At the center rear of the stage is a set of three low pedestals. The center pedestal of these three is slightly elevated from the ones on either side. This center pedestal is where Star stands. She wears a gold robe.

At the right rear of the stage is another high pedestal, lower than that of God, in which Satan stands. He wears a black robe. The Rats and various Demons are gathered in front of Satan.

The Rats all wear black robes and carry black scarves. The Rats represent the occult members. The Demons all wear body suits. One Dragon wears a red suit with green scarves and represents unrighteous anger and ill temper. Devil wears a green suit with orange scarves and represents confusion and madness. Emos wears a purple suit and blue scarves and represents depression, sadness and being alone. Royal wears a gold suit and purple scarves, representing false rulers, and self appointed power. Eros wears a pink suit with red scarves representing physical desire or empty longing for passion such as the love for drink or other addictions. Tenet wears an orange body suit and silver scarves representing beliefs in a religion that believes in the organization rather than the truth. Dogma wears a silver suit and gold scarves representing authoritative and judgmental doctrine. Id wears a blue suit with pink scarves to represent the instinctual and unconscious nature of sin.

In this same area, out of sight or off to the side, is a chair holding Asa. He wears a nude colored body suit and a big fancy ladies hat. The small cave, big enough to fit one crouched person is also somewhere on stage out of sight with the spotted scarf inside or Velcro spots on a scarf.

The character of “Times Eye” represents time. The character should signify Father Time in appearance, with a white robe or, Time, in a white robe wearing or carrying a clock. A spotlight appears to the right of the stage to draw attention Times Eye as the character walks slowly from the right side of the stage to exit the left side of the stage as the character speaks. At the same time a spot lights appear on Jesus and God. From this point the spot lights are ever present on God and Jesus except for one important moment during the play. A red light may illuminate Satan in the same way. This is an artistic representation of their constant and unwavering presence.

Times Eye“Revoke, ‘tis I, time’s eye.  Finish sin if eyes emit… six a.m.  … Max is noon… 01, 02, 2010… 12, 02, 2021?”

This statement represents an expression concerning the end of time and the end of sin. Note that the dates can be changed to reflect current times, 11, 02, 2011, … 02, 02, 2020 etc., while maintaining the palindrome, as time progresses beyond these dates. This action keeps with the artistic intent that no one knows when time will end while highlighting the possibility it could be soon.

The Demons and Rats begin moving from the right of the stage to the left of the stage, towards the pews following Time. The Rats slink. The Demons walk, skip, jump and dance. A spotlight falls upon Star as Tenet places a silver scarf on Star. The artistic intent is to symbolize false worship. Tenet pulls Eva from the pews.  Id places a pink scarf on her. Royal gives Star a purple scarf. This signifies the idolization of royalty. When scarves are given they are initially seen as beautiful but as they mount in numbers they become a burden to the wearer. Tenet puts Eva on a pedestal next to Star. Tenet places a silver scarf on Eva. The Rats worship Eva and Star. Royal places a purple scarf on Eva. The Rats give Eva and Star black Scarves. The black scarves symbolize the occult.

Jesus ChristReviled, Eva’s dog swept pews!”

Eva, Rats, Star and Demons react at this statement and a spot lights sweeps through the pews. The Rats and Demons whisper to those in the pews. The artistic intent is that this statement and actions symbolize temptation. Id gives all the Rats a pink scarf.

Jesus ChristGod!”

Jesus makes a hand gesture towards God as if announcing God’s presence. God continues to be ever observant. Every one in pews, Rats, Demons, Star and Eva react.

Jesus ChristDias”

Jesus makes a hand gesture towards the pews. Lighting increases so that the left side of the stage is fully viewable.

Dias family- “Ah!!”

All characters that are members of the Dias Family speak this in awe and fear.

Jesus Christ– “Satan said”

A spotlight shows Satan at the right of the stage. Ideally a light might illuminate each person as their name is spoken or/and as they speak as characters.

Satan- “Star-Di, Asa, Dennis, Natasha, Ron, Maori, Ida, Ed, Hannah,

One Dragon, Eva, Sharon, Naomi, Isa, Emos, Deborah, Royal, Rats, Eros,

Tenet, Dogma, Id, Nacina, Paris, Devil …Sinned.”

As Satan speaks lighting increases to show the full stage, he points to all the characters, accusingly. Each character reacts to its name as they might in the time of judgment.

Jesus ChristTenet”

Tenet gives all the Rats silver scarves then is walking around the pews whispering in the ears of the people. The artistic intent is the temptation to sin under religious doctrine.

Tenet“God…Too far away…Murmur, murmur…”

Tenet draws attention to the center stage with Star on a pedestal as he whispers. Tenet is tempting people with religious doctrine that is not based on truth.

Jesus Christ“Rats”

The Rats (five in total) are walking around the pews whispering in the ears of the people, tempting them with false rewards for joining the occult.

Rat One“‘Y no mere clay or wonder… Murmur murmur…”

The artistic intent of this statement is the idolization of the self. Royal gives Rat One a purple scarf.  Rat One pulls Ron, Eva’s boyfriend, from the pews. Id puts a pink scarf on him. Rat One places a black scarf on Ron to symbolize his acceptance of the occult and puts him on the other pedestal next to Star. Tenet places a silver scarf on Ron. All the Rats worship Ron, Eva and Star. Royal places a purple scarf on Ron. Eros gives Rat Two a bottle of Rum, and places a red scarf on Rat Two. This symbolizes the empty longing for passion and temptation to fill this with drink. Since Rats are also people, they can receive scarves as well. Eros is whispering to Rat One. Rat Two pulls Dennis Dias from the pews and gives him the bottle of rum and a black scarf. Id places a pink scarf on him. Dennis proceeds to drink. Eros drapes a red scarf on Dennis.

Rat Two-“Yes! Orders red rum, redder Eh?”

Rat Two rejoices at the drunkenness of Dennis Dias. Dennis Dias pulls Natasha Dias (his daughter) from the pews and gives her the rum. Id places a pink scarf on her. A Rat gives Natasha a black scarf. She drinks and also becomes drunk. She gives the rum back to Dennis. Eros drapes a red scarf on Natasha. They both begin worshipping Star (AKA  Dog Star, Di, Star-Di, Dog, and Doggie), The various names of Star symbolizes the many possibilities for people to find idols, in great objects in the sky, royalty, or leaders, famous people, animals, or trendy concepts and ideas etc. Ron and Eva are also being worshiped. Ron and Eva participate in the drink and are given red scarves from Eros.

Rat Two“ ‘Twas I!”

Rat Two rejoices in the accomplishments.

Rat Three“ Dog!…”

Rat Three points at and accuses Star. Dogma gives Rat Three a Gold scarf symbolizing false judgment and blame.

Rat Four“Tonsured rum pots!”

Rat Four accuses Dennis, Natasha, Ron and Eva. Dogma gives Rat Four a Gold scarf.

Jesus ChristSaid”

Rat Five addresses every one including the audience pointing as Dogma places a Gold scarf on him.

Rat Five- “Murder… Red Rose of Sharon!”….

At this statement the cross behind Jesus lights up. Jesus puts his arms out as if hanging on the cross and bows his head. All lights go out so that the stage and audience is in complete darkness for three seconds. The artistic intent is the three days Jesus spent in Darkness. If this is not desirable by the production then the red light on Satan may remain as Satan rejoices in victory. After three seconds the lights resume as before. The Rats point at God, questioning his allowance of the crucifixion of Jesus. Devil places orange scarves on them.

Rats- “He murders red rose… Y?”

Jesus ChristDennis said”

As Dennis is speaking Natasha gets on her knees in front of Star. Dennis points out her guilt in worshipping Star.

Dennis“sinned?  Did I? Now I won top spot.  Ah… Natasha Dias sees dog star…put it up…”

Dogma places a gold scarf on Dennis symbolizing unrighteous judgment.

Jesus ChristSinned”

Dennis“…as a god. Fool… A! Wow…, ‘Ave, ‘Ave some red rum too.

Fall apart, Natasha.”

Dennis gives Natasha the bottle of rum again. Tenet speaks and all the Rats and Demons jump and dance.

Jesus Christ“Tenet”

Tenet- “Lives evil!”…

A Rat gives Dennis a bottle of lager. He drinks it then gives the lager to Natasha with his next line.

Jesus Christ“Dennis”

Dennis- “‘Ave some lager?”

Natasha, suddenly feels repulsed at being drunk, throws the drinks down and turns to Star offering to bring her sister Hannah into the occult in exchange for forgiveness. Tenet gives Natasha a silver scarf.

Jesus Christ“Natasha Dias”

Natasha Dias“Doggy! Dash sin if I deliver Hannah?”

Natasha pulls Hannah from the pews and brings her to Star, AKA  Star-Di, Dog, Doggy, Di, Dog Star, who is too self absorbed to notice. Id places a pink scarf on her. Hannah is given a black scarf by a Rat and begins worshipping Star. Tenet places a silver scarf on her.

Jesus Christ“Star-Di”

Star-Di- “Did I as I? Was I? I was raw Dog, as a devil, I am god deified.”

As Star is speaking Devil puts an orange scarf on her symbolizing confusion and madness.

Jesus Christ“Dennis said”

As Dennis is speaking the Rats are pointing at Ron and Eva and whispering in both his and Natasha’s ears.

Dennis- “Ha! Ron? He lived as a rat’s god.

Wow, I Liven a mood. I roamed under it…

Revolt, AHA, Live!”

While this is being said Tenet is whispering to Dennis who then struggles with Ron and throws Ron off his pedestal. Tenet helps Dennis unto the pedestal and gives him a silver scarf. At the word “revolt” Natasha throws Eva off her pedestal, and takes her place. Royal gives Dennis and Natasha a purple scarf.

Jesus ChristHe said”

Dennis- “as a “foeman” as I live.”

Naomi and Ed, Ron’s parents, leave the pews to comfort Ron and Eva. Id places pink scarves on Naomi and Ed. A Rat leads Hannah to a stand next to her sister, Natasha’s pedestal. Royal places a purple scarf on her. Both revel in being worshipped by the Rats. As Natasha speaks to Dennis in the next line, Nacina and Ida, friends of Natasha, leave the pews and are given pink scarves by Id.

Jesus ChristNatasha said”

Natasha- “Did Nacina play or did moody Ida? So… Ida? Adios!

Hey Dad, are we not drawn onward? ”

As Natasha speaks, The Rats give Nacina and Ida black scarves and they join in the occult of worshipping those on the pedestals. Emos gives Ida a blue scarf symbolizing depression. At the word, “Adios” Ida walks away crying. Tenet gives Nacina a silver scarf. Nacina is whispering to Sharon, who is in the pews and she leaves the pews as well and is given a black scarf by a Rat and a pink scarf by Id. She stands next to her father, Dennis’s pedestal, and is given a purple scarf by Royal.

Jesus Christ“Dias said”

Dennis is talking to Satan in the following line. He is offering his three daughters to Satan, expecting something in return. He then accuses Hannah just as he had Natasha before.

Dennis–  Ah! Satan. Rats deliver goddesses, so pay. Flesh saw a sin, mad, dastard, Hannah, raw as a widened dam.”

Devil places an orange scarf on Hannah, symbolizing confusion and madness.

Jesus ChristHannah”

Hannah- “I madam, I made fool a poor Dog.”

Hannah points to herself at the word “fool” and to Star at the word “Dog”. At these statements, Hannah stops worshipping Star and walks away, weeping and distraught. Deborah, Hannah’s mother, leaves the pews to comfort her. Id places a pink scarf on Deborah. Natasha is observing her mother and sister, feeling remorse. Star has also stopped her self absorption to take notice of the events.

Jesus Christ Natasha Dias”

Natasha“I”

Natasha moans as the narrator, Jesus says the word “moan” and points at Hannah.

Jesus Christ“moan”

Natasha“ go deliver Eh? I saw thee mad!”

Natasha is mournful; crying as Emos puts a blue scarf on her. Star has become visibly upset by this point.

Jesus Christ“Dennis Dias”

Dennis is speaking to Satan about his daughters.

Dennis-Sir, appalls Dog…”

Jesus Christ-“Stops”

Dennis “stops” for a moment then, upset by Star’s upset, he again curses Hannah. One Dragon places a green scarf on Dennis.

Dennis“…sleep repel, Eros eye saw Hannah.”

Eros puts a red scarf on Hannah and she is given drink. She becomes drunk and falls at Eva’s feet.

Jesus Christ“Said Hannah”

Hannah-Eva! Can I live on?”

Eva ignores her. Paris, Hannah’s boyfriend, leaves the pews to comfort her. Id places a pink scarf on him.

Satan speaks although not announced expressing pleasure at the situation.

Satan“Hannah, O’ No…  Ah…”

Jesus Christ-“Satan”

Satan continues, encouraging evil and sin.

Satan“Live dirt up!”

Jesus Christ-“Mom said”

Deborah confronts her husband, Dennis, blaming him for their daughter’s predicaments. Dogma places a gold scarf on her.

Deborah-Ha, Robed!”

Deborah begins to cry. Emos places a blue scarf on her. Norah, Deborah’s mother, leaves the pews to comfort her. Id places a pink scarf on elderly Norah.

Jesus Christ“God”

God speaks, to Natasha and Hannah, warning them that these things are not from him. Each reacts in fear and weeping. Everyone reacts by cringing. God points to Jesus, Reminding everyone that their sins are what Jesus died for. God warns that the Demons, such as Devil and One Dragon, and those things they worship, such as the Dog Star (AKA, of many names), do not have their interests in mind. The Demons cower at his words, as does Star. God asks the people to repent and warns them of the dangers of losing eternity spent close to God (the Garden). God speaks to the elders of the church, Norah, also known as “Red Rose” symbolic of her pious and close relationship to Jesus as the “Red Rose of Sharon”, and Naomi who consider themselves pillars of the church, warning them of the danger they are also in.

God- “Live not on evil, Madam Natasha, Madam Hannah Dias!

Murder Regal Red Rose of Sharon? I name no Devil-Dog as selfless.

A Devil! One Dragon! Pupils pull up! No Garden, O!

Norah, regal red rose… Y? Naomi…?”

Jesus Christ Moan…”

God moans as Jesus states the word “Moan”, both showing great distress.

God- “ ‘Y doom?”

The Rats are whispering in the ear of Ron while pointing at DennisRon moves towards Dennis but Sharon notices him. Rats also whisper in the ear of Eva, pointing at Natasha.

Jesus Christ-“Sharon Dias”

Sharon calls to her mother, Deborah, as Ron struggles to throw Dennis off the pedestal. She pleads with the demon Devil to help her father; no one is interested in helping. Sharon becomes confused in her excitement. Devil places an orange scarf on her.

Sharon“Mom, Ei! Reverie! Live O’ Devil, never odd or even.

No, it is opposition. ‘Y a period won? Oh!

Who was it I saw, Oh Who? Ha!”

Jesus Christ-“Ron”

Dennis is thrown to the ground and Ron takes his place on the pedestal, hollering triumphantly as he replies to Sharon. Despite this, Sharon remains near the pedestal, being worshipped.

Ron“I”

During this same time Eva struggles with Natasha but does not succeed.

Jesus Christ“Eva”

Eva cries out in triumph for Ron’s success and continues to struggle with Natasha.

Eva-Revolt lover!”

Jesus Christ“Id”

The Rats are in fervor.

Id-Rats gnash teeth!”

Natasha throws Eva to the ground and the struggle stops. Natasha remains on her pedestal.

Jesus Christ-“Sang Star-Di”

Star is still in madness, upset by all the commotion, and sings her words.

Star“Do… Do Good’s deeds. Live on? Reviled did I live! God saw!

 I, deified, I was Dog. Evil I did deliver. No! Evil’s deeds do, O God! O! Did Rats gnash teeth?”

Star is visibly depressed; Emos places a blue scarf on her. She continues dramatically, after a pause…

Jesus Christ“Sang Star-Di”

Star-Revolt! Love! Rave I?”

Dennis is attempting to reclaim his position but is continually repelled by Ron. Norah, Dennis’s mother, becomes distraught and confused about what she should do as Ron is the son of her best friend Naomi. Devil places an orange scarf on her.

Jesus Christ-“Norah”

Norah“Oh who was it I saw, Oh who? Now do I repay?

No, it is opposition. Never odd or even…Live? Do evil? Ei!!, reverie!”

Deborah speaks to Norah but she is inconsolable. Emos places a blue scarf on Norah.

Jesus Christ-“Mom said”

Deborah-Norah’s moody.”

Jesus Christ-“Naomi. (moan)”

Naomi moans when the word is spoken. She asks for and is given lager as Eros places a red scarf on her. She then rejoices, lifting the lager, for her son, Ron. Dennis ends his struggle with Ron.

Naomi- Yes, order lager… Ha! Ron.”

Jesus Christ-“One Dragon”

One Dragon speaks to everyone, mocking what God has said and declaring Ron as a god, and as himself as he places a green scarf on Ron.

One Dragon“Pull up? Slip up! No Garden? O’, lived as selfless?

A god lived one man! I.”

The Rats all dance with lager and rum around Norah, tormenting her and offering her drink which she keeps refusing.

Jesus ChristNorah’s foes order lager, red rum…

Said Hannah”

Hannah makes an appeal to Norah, her grandmother, warning her, then points to and denounces Satan and Star.

Hannah- Madam, Ah!!! Satan! Madam, live not on evil. Dog!”

Jesus Christ“Deborah Dias (mom)”

Deborah points at Natasha, blaming her. Dogma places a gold scarf on Deborah. Deborah encourages Hannah to go away to a cave that is far back on the stage.

Deborah“Putrid evil, Natasha!  O’ No! Hannah, No evil in a cave…”

In the cave is “spots”, like a cloth with Velcro spots to symbolize leprosy. Hannah goes into the cave and puts on this cloth. As Jesus speaks the next lines Hannah sits at the mouth of the cave “peeling spots” Paris, Hannah’s boyfriend, leaves the pews. When Jesus states “Sllap” God makes a motion towards Hannah. Hannah is healed and drops the spotted scarf.

Jesus Christ Hannah Dias? Hannah was eye sore leper, (peels spots)

God, “SLLap!”… Paris said”

Paris points to Hannah, accusing her of sinning, deserving of leprosy. One Dragon places a green scarf on Paris. Paris denies his own responsibility or sin. Id places a pink scarf on him. Paris points to Star in blame. Dogma places a gold scarf on him.

Paris-Sinned dame… Eh? ‘Twas I? Here, vile Dog!”

Hannah rejoins the group, near Naomi and Ed. The Rats continue dancing around Norah who can not get away from them.

Jesus Christ-Naomi said”

Naomi looks at her friend, Norah, and is sad. Emos places a blue scarf on her. As she speaks, she notices Satan and is afraid. Naomi turns to her husband Ed and then to Hannah, asking if she is mad.

Naomi“Ah!!! Satan! Go droop aloof. Ed, am I mad?

Am I, Hannah? Madden…”

Jesus Christ“Ed”

Ed replies as Devil places an orange scarf on him. Ed exclaims war, symbolizing the war between good and evil.

Ed“I was… A war!”

Jesus Christ“Hannah”

Hannah also replies, still confused. Looking at Norah and Naomi.

Hannah“Drat, sad… Damn!”

Jesus Christ“Isa”

Isa, wife of Asa, leaves the pews; Id places a pink scarf on her. She accuses Star and receives a gold scarf from Dogma.

Isa“Wash self, Ya, possessed Dog, reviled Star!”

Jesus Christ“Natasha Dias said”

Natasha remains enamored with Star, speaking to and idolizing her father, Dennis, encouraging him to regain his position of power.

Natasha“…Drawn onward, to new era…Dad yeh… So…”

Jesus Christ-Ida”

Natasha’s friend Ida, echoes the same sentiments speaking to Star.

Ida- “Adios A! Di, ‘Y doom, Did Royal panic and Id?”

Jesus Christ-Dias”

Dennis, Sharon and Natasha all speak in agreement in the next line and continue in unison after Satan speaks.

Dennis, Sharon and Natasha- “Ah,”

Jesus Christ-Satan”

Satan points to Asa asleep in a chair off to the side of the stage, stating he is evil. Eros places a red scarf on Asa and Id places a pink scarf on him.

Satan-Evil is a name of Asa”

As Satan speaks, all the Rats except for one leave Norah. One Dragon places a green scarf on Norah. As the Rat One whispers in her ear, she also takes notice of Asa.

Jesus Christ-Dias”

Dennis, Sharon and Natasha-Eh?, Evil!, a hat lover, tired nude.”

Maori, a friend of Isa, is drawn from the pews by Isa, receiving a pink scarf from Id.

Jesus Christ-Maori”

Maori points to Asa while she speaks, and receives a gold scarf from Dogma. She denies her own responsibility and is wowed by the idol worship of Star. She receives a black scarf from a Rat, and a silver scarf form Tenet.

Maori-Doom an evil! I? wow, Dog Star as a Devil, eh?”

A Rat also begins whispering in the ear of Dennis, pointing to Eva who is worshipping the Star. Dogma places a gold scarf on Norah. Norah “murders” Asa by throwing a black cloth over him.

Jesus Christ- Norah Dias Sinned.  Deified Dogma”

Dogma is overjoyed and declares war between God and evil (all the Rats and Demons.)

Dogma“I lived as a god. War saw I. I saw! I said I did… Rats!”

Jesus Christ-Hannah”

Hannah continues speaking in remorse; she calls out to God, with a capital G, asking “Why”.

Hannah-Reviled, I finish sad. ‘Y “G” God?”

Jesus Christ-said”

She again denounces Satan with sarcasm.

Hannah- Ah!! Satan regal?!”

Jesus Christ-Emos”

Emos points to Eva, accusing her.

Emos-Eva… Sinned… lives Evil!”

Jesus Christ-Tenet”

Tenet is reacting to Dennis approaching Eva from behind.

Tenet-Ah…”

Devil places an orange scarf on Dennis, symbolizing madness.

Jesus Christ-Satan”

Satan is speaking to all the Demons and Rats, who react with fervor.

Satan-Trap all afoot, murder!”

Jesus Christ-Emos”

As Emos says Eva’s name, Dennis approaches Eva.

Emos-Eva!”

Jesus Christ-Eva”

Dennis “Murders” her, by throwing a black cloth over her as she is speaking and worshipping Star, in mid sentence.

Eva-Wow, Aloof Dog as a…!”

Jesus Christ-Dennis”

Dennis takes notice of God and in a revelation, feeling remorse at what he has done, declares to the Rats that God sees.

Dennis-Put it up! Rats! God sees.”

Jesus Christ-said”

Dennis cries out in fear and repentance.

Dennis-Ah!!!”

Jesus Christ-Satan”

Satan rejoices over the events.

Satan- “Ha, top spot. Now I won, I did!  Dennis Dias sinned. Yes! Orders red rum, eh!”

Jesus Christ- Norah’s foes order red rum… Dias”

All the Rats except for one begin dancing around Norah again, tormenting her with rum. Rat One is whispering in the ear of Dennis and pointing to Natasha and Sharon. Sharon and Natasha have remained in power while Dennis has not. They show fear of their father.

Jesus Christ-Dias”

Sharon and Natasha appeal to their father as he approaches them.

Sharon and Natasha-Stop, Murder us not!”

Dennis “Murders” Sharon, tossing a black cloth over her but stops short of murdering Natasha when he hears God speak.

Jesus Christ-God”

God-I saw the redder murders.”

Jesus Christ-Red Rose”

Norah cries out to God, asking why? Norah takes the rum and becomes drunk. Eros places a red scarf on her as she sings.

Norah-Y? Rum, rum, rum, rum red now.”

Jesus Christ-Royal”

Royal dances around Star then Norah, back to Star and then dances with Tenet singing.

Royal“ceremony Star! Rum, rum, rum, rum, Ya! War a foot. Dog! Tenet!”

Jesus Christ-Dennis”

Dennis falls to his knees in confusion and remorse. He denounces his attempts at being worshipped as a god. He realizes that Star is pitiful. He points to others, that they have been robbed of their happiness by him and he himself is in misery.

Dennis“Lived Sir? A panic… and I am god, tenet? Sore Star lay or…

Ha! robed some, as I… I moan.”

Jesus Christ-Norah”

Norah calls out to God to save, realizing the consequences and the Rats scatter.

Norah-Save! No Garden, O!”

Jesus Christ-Hannah”

Hannah is mournful.

Hannah-Dead, I… I roam.”

Jesus Christ-Norah”

Norah points at Satan and at herself acknowledging evil and sin, and then to the Rats and everyone else, stating “Dias” as if inviting every one to acknowledge their own sin.

Norah-Satan!…Sinned, A!”

Jesus Christ-said”

Norah- “Rats, Dias…?”

At this point some return to the pews, I.E. those that expressed repentance by words or by actions such as Dennis, Hannah, Norah, Naomi…(artistic interpretation can decide who and how many.)

Jesus Christ-Natasha said”

Natasha, still on her pedestal cries out to the Star to save her.

Natasha-Dog!”

As Jesus speaks Natasha, Star, Ron and everyone else not in the pews crumple to the ground and scurry/crawl into the darkness towards Satan. This includes the Rats, Demons and all those that have been murdered without repenting, Eva, Sharon, Asa, also move towards Satan with all their burdens in tow. The lights go out except for lights sweeping the pews as the characters sitting there throw off all of their scarves and the grey robes revealing white robes, or body suits at their words “God Save, Deliver!” hands up rejoicing.

Jesus Christ-SWEPT PEWS…”

Everyone in pews-  “GOD SAVE! DELIVER!”

As Time speaks the light shines only on one side of the stage, joyful, while the other is in darkness and misery.

Time’s eye- 12, 02, 2021… 01, 02, 2010?  Noon… six a.m. max. Is time’s eye finish’ sin? If eyes emit is it, ek… over?”

This statement again represents an expression concerning the end of time and the end of sin. Note once again that the dates can be changed to reflect current times, 11, 02, 2011, … 02, 02, 2020 etc., while maintaining the palindrome, as time progresses beyond these dates. This action keeps with the artistic intent that no one knows when time will end while highlighting the possibility it could be soon.

End of play.

Teaching art is more than just technique

It is Creativity, Community, and Caring… and so much more

This presentation is an example of how you can make the most out of what you do. I am the art teacher in this presentation. The memories I created and the lessons learned in the minds of the children I taught live on, however through new media and new literacies  technology was used to expand the message. Take the gifts that you have been given to share with the world and use the resource the world has given you to bring them to their fullest potential.