Choosing a platform for a 3D simulation/ tour of the ability sim.

I have chosen to design a 3D environment using open simulator. The delivery I am using for this is through Kitely.com due to the low cost and easy access. This is a beneficial platform because it allows you to save your work in OAR files, use the OAR on a personal computer through Dreamworld, move it to other platforms, use on pivate servers and even convert to a Unity file. For more information on the Untiy converter you can visit, http://blog.inf.ed.ac.uk/atate/2015/08/30/opensim-oar-convert-to-unity-scene/

3D environments are immersive and interactive. It allows for synchronous or asynchronous learning depending upon the needs of the instructor and ability level of the student. Due to the wide variety of design features, video, audio, text, quiz, and question abilities with scripts, non-player characters and easy adaptability, it is the perfect environment to design an educational simulation that can be quickly changed and modified by other educators. I have Dreamworld on my home computer and can design OARs offline if I choose to or use them in a secure environment offline with students. This is why I have chosen to use this versatile option for 3D curriculum development.

If you have never visited a virtual world, to prepare for multiverse masters, I recommend , http://inspiration-island.com/educational-projects/virtual-world-survival-guide/getting-started-in-virtual-worlds/ and http://inspiration-island.com/educational-projects/virtual-world-survival-guide/ It is a course designed by another virtual world group but useful for beginners. Additional support will be in blogposts and videos onhttps://WoPoLi.com, and https://multiversmasters.blogspot.com Instructions for how to access Multiverse Masters can also be found here, https://sites.google.com/site/virtualresourcesfordevelopers/operation-design/firestorm-quickstart

Below you will find a visual tour of the work in progress.

 

Beckhusen, F. (2018). Dreamworld. Outworldz. Retrieved on Oct 18, 2018, from http://www.outworldz.com/outworldz_installer/

 

simulation 2 001

The entry point to the Island is separate from the simulation, and offers a multiple use area for several educational activities.

simulation 2 002

The Simulation entry point uses information booths and signage to help the student navigate.

simulation 2 003

Note cards deliver important information. Options are offered to the participant(s) to encourage engagement. simulation 2 004

A story line is created to engage the learner.simulation 2 005

Choices are given to allow for immediate feedback on the potential consequences of a participants actions and decisions.

simulation 2 006

Required answers can test the participants understanding.

simulation 2 007simulation 2 008simulation 2 009

Different roles can be assigned for working both individually or as a group.simulation 2 010simulation 2 011

Random statements can be programmed into non-player characters to vary the experience

simulation 2 012

Realistic environments can easily be created at low cost.

simulation 2 013

Each area can interact with the participant through the use of scripting.

simulation 2 014simulation 2 015

These areas will eventually have the question marks to guide tasks and discussions.

simulation 2 016simulation 2 017

By adding non-player Characters, even the individual can get a sense of a full story line in the simulation.

simulation 2 018simulation 2 019simulation 2 020

This is a work in progress.

Treasure hunt scripts

 

This is the script for a wearable hud that works with other game features as well. For this example we will use it just to collect tokens for finding gems. You would put this in a wearable object like jewelry,  a badge or a hat etc.

// The actual HUD //
// ——————————————–
// ——————————————–
// declare / define global variables //

integer pCoins = 0;
integer pGems = 0;
integer pScore = 0;
string vhCustomTitle = “Tresure Hunt”;
string vhTitleOffset = ” \n \nThanks for trying the Game Kit.\nBegin by collecting gem.”;
string vhMessageLine = “\n \n “;
string vhCoinString = “”;
string vhGemString = “”;
string vhScoreString = “”;
integer vhAccessCost = 0;
list pPuzzleList = [];
integer pHUDworn = 0;
string gsCardOneName = “config”;
string g_sNoteCardName;
list gOneCard;
list g_lTempLines;
integer g_iLine;
key g_kQuery;

initialize(string _action) {
if (_action == “”) {
loadNoteCard(gsCardOneName);
} else if (_action == “finish”) {
integer i;
for (i = 0; i< 7; ++i)
{
string tLineText = llList2String(gOneCard,i);
if (i == 0)
{
vhAccessCost = (integer)right(tLineText,”:”);
}
if (i == 1)
{
vhCustomTitle = right(tLineText,”:”);
vhCustomTitle = vhCustomTitle + “\n “;
}
if (i == 2)
{
vhTitleOffset = right(tLineText,”:”);
vhTitleOffset = vhTitleOffset + “\n \n “;
}
llListen(999,””, “”,””);
//llListen(reset_channel, “”, “”, “”); // RESET channel

}
}
}

loadNoteCard( string _notecard ) {
g_lTempLines = [];
g_sNoteCardName = _notecard;
g_iLine = 0;
g_kQuery = llGetNotecardLine(g_sNoteCardName, g_iLine);

}

notecardFinished(string _notecard){
if (_notecard == gsCardOneName) {
gOneCard = g_lTempLines;
initialize(“finish”);
}
}

// ——————————————–
// ——————————————–
// define global custom functions //
// these are from the lsl tutorials //

string left(string src, string divider) {
//llSubStringIndex
// find the first appearance of the divider
integer indexLF1 = llSubStringIndex( src, divider );
if(~indexLF1)
// check to see that the appearance falls in a positive number position
//string llDeleteSubString(string src, integer start, integer end)
// remove all of the text that falls to the right of the first divider
return llDeleteSubString( src, indexLF1 + llStringLength(divider)-1, -1);
return src;

}

string right(string src, string divider) {
integer index = llSubStringIndex( src, divider );
string tString = “”;
if (~index)
{
// this fetches the string to the right of the first marker
tString = llDeleteSubString( src, 0, index + llStringLength(divider) – 1);
//llSay(0,”whats left ” + src);
// now we need to get the right half of that
integer indexSR1 = llSubStringIndex(tString, divider);
if (~indexSR1)
{
// here’s the far right side of a 3 part list
tString = llDeleteSubString(tString, 0, indexSR1 + llStringLength(divider) – 1);
}
}
return tString;
}

string center(string src, string divider) {
integer index = llSubStringIndex( src, divider );
string tString2 = “”;
if(~index)
{
tString2 = llDeleteSubString( src, 0, index + llStringLength(divider) – 1);
integer indexC1 = llSubStringIndex(tString2, divider);
if (~indexC1)
{
return llDeleteSubString( tString2, indexC1 + llStringLength(divider)-1, -1);
}
}
return tString2;
}

default
{
on_rez(integer start_param)
{

if (llGetAttached() > 30)
{
pHUDworn = 1;
initialize(“”);
llSetText(vhCustomTitle + vhTitleOffset + “\n \n “, <0,0,0>, 1);
}else{
llSetText(“”, <0,0,0>, 1);
llSay(0, (string)llGetAttached());
}

}
state_entry()
{
initialize(“”);
integer messageInt = llListen(1717, “”, NULL_KEY, “” );
integer messageInt2 = llListen(1718, “”, NULL_KEY, “” );
integer messageInt3 = llListen(1719, “”, NULL_KEY, “”);
integer messageInt4 = llListen(1791, “”, NULL_KEY, “”);
integer messageInt5 = llListen(1616, “”, NULL_KEY, “”);
integer messageInt6 = llListen(2654, “”, NULL_KEY, “” );
vhCoinString = “\nTOKENS: “+(string)pCoins;
vhGemString = “\nPRIZES: “+(string)pGems;
pScore = pCoins * pGems;
vhScoreString = “\nPOINTS: “+(string)pScore;
}

touch_start(integer total_number)
{
// if they touch the scorekeeping object – readout the scores
vhCoinString = “\nTOKENS: “+(string)pCoins;
vhGemString = “\nPRIZES: “+(string)pGems;
pScore = pCoins * pGems;
vhScoreString = “\nPOINTS: “+(string)pScore;
if (pHUDworn == 1)
{
llSetText(vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString, <0,0,0>, 1);
}else{
llInstantMessage(llGetOwner(),vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString);
}
}

listen( integer channel, string name, key id, string message )
{
if (channel == 1717)
//llSay(0, (string)channel + ” ” + name + ” ” + (string)id + ” ” + message);
{
string mesR = right(message, “:”);
string mesL = left(message, “:”);
string mesC = center(message, “:”);
integer tValue = (integer)mesR; // convert the coin string to a number
//llSay(0, (string)llGetOwner());
//llSay(0, mesL);
if (mesL == (string)llGetOwner())

// this is the parse for hud owner messages only
{
//llSay(0, “LINE 110: ” +(string)tValue);
pCoins = pCoins + tValue;
// fix according to positive v negative values
vhCoinString = “\nTOKENS: “+(string)pCoins;
vhGemString = “\nPRIZES: “+(string)pGems;
pScore = pCoins * pGems;
vhScoreString = “\nPOINTS: “+(string)pScore;
if (pHUDworn == 1)
{
llSetText(vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+mesC+vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString, <0,0,0>, 1);
}else{
llInstantMessage(llGetOwner(), vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+mesC+vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString);
}
}
// llSay(0, (string)pCoins);
}

if (channel == 1718)
{
string mesR = right(message, “:”);
string mesL = left(message, “:”);
string mesC = center(message, “:”);
integer tValue = (integer)mesR; // convert the coin string to a number
//llSay(0, mesL);
//llSay(0, (string)llGetOwner());
if (mesL == (string)llGetOwner())
{
if (tValue > 0)
{
if (pCoins >= tValue)
{
//llSay(0, “LINE 132: ” +(string)tValue);
pCoins = pCoins – tValue;
}else{
pCoins = 0;
}
}
vhCoinString = “\nTOKENS: “+(string)pCoins;
vhGemString = “\nPRIZES: “+(string)pGems;
pScore = pCoins * pGems;
vhScoreString = “\nPOINTS: “+(string)pScore;

if (pHUDworn == 1)
{
llSetText(vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+mesC+vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString, <0,0,0>, 1);
}else{
llInstantMessage(llGetOwner(), vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+mesC+vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString);
}
}
}

if (channel ==1719)
{
if (message == (string)llGetOwner())
{

if (pCoins >= vhAccessCost)
{
pCoins = pCoins – vhAccessCost;
llSay(1720, “Y”);
vhCoinString = “\nTOKENS: “+(string)pCoins;
vhGemString = “\nPRIZES: “+(string)pGems;
pScore = pCoins * pGems;
vhScoreString = “\nPOINTS: “+(string)pScore;
if (pHUDworn == 1)
{
llSetText(vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+”You spent “+ (string)vhAccessCost+ ” tokens to use this object.” +vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString, <0,0,0>, 1);
}else{
llSay(0, vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+”You spent “+ (string)vhAccessCost+ ” tokens to use this object.” +vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString);
}
}else{
llSay(1720, “N”);
}
}
}

if (channel == 1791)
{
if (message == (string)llGetOwner())
{
// here we should add a list to hold which objects have been acquired. We can do it by storing a list of the
// puzzle boards that awarded gems – and simply ignoring repeat awards – (you could add a message to that effect as well.
list tTest = [id]; // the uuid of the puzzle board
integer foundIndex = llListFindList(pPuzzleList, tTest);
if (foundIndex == -1)
{
pGems = pGems+1;
list insertNameList = [id];
pPuzzleList = llListInsertList(pPuzzleList, insertNameList, 0);
vhCoinString = “\nTOKENS: “+(string)pCoins;
vhGemString = “\nPRIZES: “+(string)pGems;
pScore = pCoins * pGems;
vhScoreString = “\nPOINTS: “+(string)pScore;
if (pHUDworn == 1)
{
llSetText(vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+”You earned a prize.”+vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString, <0,0,0>, 1);
}else{
llInstantMessage(llGetOwner(), vhCustomTitle+vhMessageLine+”You earned a prize.”+vhCoinString+vhGemString+vhScoreString);
}
}else{
llInstantMessage(llGetOwner(), “You have already earned this prize.”);
}
}else{

//llSay(0, message);
key tKeyMes = (key)message;
list tTest = [tKeyMes];
//llSay(0, (string)pPuzzleList);
//llSay(0, (string)tTest);
integer foundIndex = llListFindList(pPuzzleList, tTest);
//llSay(0, (string)foundIndex);
llSay(3719, (string)foundIndex);
}

}
if (channel == 1616)
{
string whoCalled = right(message, “:”);
if (whoCalled == “board”)
{
llSay(1617, ((string)pCoins + “:” + (string)pGems));
}else{
llSay(1417, ((string)pCoins + “:” + (string)pGems));
}
}

if (channel == 2654)
{
llSay(2655, “ScorekeeperReply”);
}

}
dataserver(key _query_id, string _data)
{
if (_query_id == g_kQuery) {
if (_data != EOF) {
g_lTempLines += [_data];
g_iLine++;
g_kQuery = llGetNotecardLine(g_sNoteCardName, g_iLine);
} else {
notecardFinished(g_sNoteCardName);
}
}
}

}


 

This is the notecard you would include in the object as well. Title in config

 

// PAY BOARDS TO PLAY // :5
// HUD GAME TITLE // :Treasure Hunt Game
// INSTRUCTIONS // : Collect gems.


 

And now for the treasure token script put this inside any object you want to award tokens for finding.

 

string pCoinValue = “30”; // um, change the number to make it worth more or less
string pAcquireMessage = “Follow the gems.”; // change the text inside quotes to make it say something different
string CONTROLLER_ID = “A”;
float tAlpha = 0.8; // set this to 1.0 if you want your object to be fully opaque.
// for the adventurous, you could make a random list and choose different things to say
string gsCardOneName = “config”;
list gOneCard;
list g_lTempLines;
string g_sNoteCardName;
integer g_iLine;
string g_kQuery;
integer resetChannel = 3;
integer respawnDelay = 30;
string vhUseParticles = “TRUE”;
float vhTargetOmega = 0.3;

 

//—————– PRIVATE —————————–
string left(string src, string divider) {
integer index = llSubStringIndex( src, divider );
if(~index)
{
return llDeleteSubString( src, index + llStringLength(divider)-1, -1);
}
return src;
}

string right(string src, string divider) {
integer index = llSubStringIndex( src, divider );
string tString = “”;
if (~index)
{
return llDeleteSubString( src, 0, index + llStringLength(divider) – 1);
}
return tString;
}

initialize(string _action) {
if (_action == “”) {
//llSay(0, “1”);
loadNoteCard(gsCardOneName);
} else if (_action == “finish”) {
//llSay(0, “2”);
integer i;
for (i = 0; i< 7; ++i)
{
string tLineText = llList2String(gOneCard,i);
if (i == 0)
{
pCoinValue = right(tLineText,”:”);
}
if (i == 1)
{
pAcquireMessage = right(tLineText,”:”);
}
if (i == 2)
{
string tAlphaString = right(tLineText,”:”);
tAlpha = (float)tAlphaString;
}
if (i == 3)
{
string stresetChannel = right(tLineText, “:”);
resetChannel = (integer)stresetChannel;
integer lHandle5 = llListen(resetChannel, “”,””,””);
}
if (i == 4)
{
string stRespawnDelay = right(tLineText, “:”);
respawnDelay = (integer)stRespawnDelay;
//llSay(0, stRespawnDelay);
}
if (i == 5)
{
vhUseParticles = right(tLineText, “:”);
if (vhUseParticles == “TRUE”)
{
llMessageLinked( LINK_SET, TRUE, CONTROLLER_ID, NULL_KEY );
}else{
llMessageLinked( LINK_SET, FALSE, CONTROLLER_ID, NULL_KEY );
}
}
if (i == 6)
{
string stvhTargetOmega = right(tLineText, “:”);
vhTargetOmega = (float)stvhTargetOmega;
llTargetOmega(<0,0,vhTargetOmega>, 10, 10);
}
}
}
}

loadNoteCard( string _notecard ) {
g_lTempLines = [];
g_sNoteCardName = _notecard;
g_iLine = 0;
g_kQuery = llGetNotecardLine(g_sNoteCardName, g_iLine);
}

notecardFinished(string _notecard){
if (_notecard == gsCardOneName) {
gOneCard = g_lTempLines;
initialize(“finish”);
}
}
//——————————————–

 

default
{
state_entry()
//
{
initialize(“”);
// on stateChange do stuff
//integer lHandle5 = llListen(resetChannel, “”,””,””);
llSetLinkAlpha(LINK_SET, tAlpha, ALL_SIDES);
// set entire prim 100% visible.
//llTargetOmega(<0,0,vhTargetOmega>, 10, 10);
llSetStatus(STATUS_PHANTOM, TRUE);
llSetStatus(STATUS_ROTATE_Z, TRUE);
llTargetOmega(<0,0,vhTargetOmega>, 10, 10);
llVolumeDetect(TRUE);
}
touch_start(integer total_number)

{
float tAlpha = (llGetAlpha(ALL_SIDES/llGetNumberOfSides()));
//llSay(0,(string)tAlpha);
if (tAlpha>0.0)
{
//llInstantMessage(llDetectedKey(0), “You picked up a Spanish Doubloon!”);
// make it invisible
llSetAlpha(0.0, ALL_SIDES);llSetLinkAlpha(LINK_SET, 0.0, ALL_SIDES);
// set entire prim 100% invisible.
llSetStatus(STATUS_ROTATE_Z, FALSE);
llSetStatus(STATUS_PHANTOM, TRUE);
// make it non-physical
// start a timer
// make it reappear after n seconds (n=60)
if (respawnDelay > 0)
{
llSetTimerEvent(respawnDelay);
}
// send a message to the gatherer’s HUD to add 1 coin
llSay(1717, ((string) llDetectedKey(0) + “:” + pAcquireMessage + “:” + pCoinValue));
llMessageLinked( LINK_SET, FALSE, CONTROLLER_ID, NULL_KEY );
//llSay(0, ((string) llDetectedKey(0) + “:” + pAcquireMessage + “:” + pCoinValue));
// llSay(1717, ((string) llDetectedKey(0) + “: 100”)); // would also work now or any integer positive or negative for that matter.
}

}
collision_start(integer num_detected)
{
float tAlpha = (llGetAlpha(ALL_SIDES/llGetNumberOfSides()));
if (tAlpha>0.0)
{
//llInstantMessage(llDetectedKey(0), “You picked up a Spanish Doubloon!”);
// make it invisible
llSetLinkAlpha(LINK_SET, 0.0, ALL_SIDES);
// set entire prim 100% invisible.
llSetStatus(STATUS_ROTATE_Z, FALSE);
llSetStatus(STATUS_PHANTOM, TRUE);

if (respawnDelay > 0)
{
llSetTimerEvent(respawnDelay);
}
llSay(1717, ((string) llDetectedKey(0) + “:” + pAcquireMessage + “:” + pCoinValue));
llVolumeDetect(FALSE);

llMessageLinked( LINK_SET, FALSE, CONTROLLER_ID, NULL_KEY );
}
}
//////
listen(integer channel, string name, key id, string mes)
{

if (channel == resetChannel)
{
initialize(“”);
llSay(0, “Okay, I reset the token”);
llSetLinkAlpha(LINK_SET, 1.0, ALL_SIDES);
if (vhUseParticles == “TRUE”)
{
llMessageLinked( LINK_SET, TRUE, CONTROLLER_ID, NULL_KEY );
}else{
llMessageLinked( LINK_SET, FALSE, CONTROLLER_ID, NULL_KEY );
}
llSetStatus(STATUS_PHANTOM, TRUE);
llVolumeDetect(TRUE);
//llSetTimerEvent(0);

}
}
//////////

timer()
{
//llResetScript();
llSetLinkAlpha(LINK_SET, tAlpha, ALL_SIDES);
if (vhUseParticles == “TRUE”)
{
llMessageLinked( LINK_SET, TRUE, CONTROLLER_ID, NULL_KEY );
}else{
llMessageLinked( LINK_SET, FALSE, CONTROLLER_ID, NULL_KEY );
}
llVolumeDetect(TRUE);
llSetStatus(STATUS_PHANTOM, TRUE);
llSleep(1);
llSetTimerEvent(0);
}
dataserver(key _query_id, string _data)
{
if (_query_id == g_kQuery) {
if (_data != EOF) {
g_lTempLines += [_data];
g_iLine++;
g_kQuery = llGetNotecardLine(g_sNoteCardName, g_iLine);
} else {
notecardFinished(g_sNoteCardName);
}
}
}
}

 

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-and the notecard for the token is also titled config

How many credits is this token worth? :30
What message should this token say? :Nice find! These Gems will help you on your path.
How opaque is this token?(range is 0.0-1.0) :1.0
What channel number should be used for reset? :3
How many seconds delay before respawning? :30
The token should use particles? (TRUE or FALSE) :TRUE
Speed / direction of spin? (range -1.000 – 1.000) :0.0
// never delete a colon
// Spin speed can be set to 0.0 for no spin
// If you use a HUD, message length should not be longer than about 60 characters.
// resetting any value above is entirely optional.
// Set respawn delay to a negative integer to prevent respawning
// You can reset any token using the channel defined above (if for example you left it channel 3, type ‘/3 ‘ and enter

 

Multiverse Masters Moon Base Proof of concept

 

Slide Show Presented at the CUNY gaming conference in New York City via distance with the assistance of Professor Mark Lewis.

The Best Practices discussion will include an educational game-play prototype  and educator resources as well as content examples to demonstrate how socially-networked learning environments in a three dimensional virtual world and gamification in the virtual world can be beneficial for distance learners and education applications. The main focus for this paper will be a “Best Practices” discussion with a question and answer session in world. During live events technical issues are always a possibility. This is especially true with participants who have never interacted with the technology before. Back up systems can be put in place that allow for participation through other means. This could be a simultaneous meeting in Skype or zoom to combat any sound or access issues. Even live streaming on Youtube may be an option.

The short discussion on Best Practices can be proceeded or followed by individual exploration. The independent walk about will consist of game features and curriculum examples. Guidance may be provided through live in-world chat and voice if pre-scheduled. The participants will likely be educators who are exploring virtual worlds and looking for resources and best practices. Participants may enter the virtual world via a pre-made avatar through a virtual world viewer such as Firestorm or use their own avatar. They can also customize their avatar with freebies offered on site.The participants will need to have some experience in the virtual world and be comfortable with all basic movement and navigational tools.  For those who are not, resources will be made available to other virtual worlds designed with tutorials and tips on these functions.

Preparation for users who have never entered a virtual world is extensive. In a complete pilot program creating your own content to teach students how to use the technology and navigate the tool is ideal however lots of resources exist to help beginners learn how to navigate virtual worlds. Providing links and resources, even when created by others and giving the necessary credit is a viable option. An online resource to get started is the Virtual World Survival Guide (Marie, E. 2016) It is a course designed by another virtual world group. Also creating a support website and support documents or links to other support documents and websites created by third parties is beneficial in the preparation aspect of a a full pilot.  Even in considering an educator’s help guide, important information for educators were found in the actual kitely.com website under terms and conditions and privacy. Another important resource is the educators commons on OSGRID and social sites online by this and other groups. By making this information easily accessible within the learning environment I am reducing unnecessary duplication of resources.

The game design itself is very simple for teachers to implement with students of all ages. The goal is to have the student engage in the activities, be rewarded by tokens that can earn free objects in world, avoid obstacles and traps that will slow progress or remove tokens, and earn prizes or earn points by taking quizzes. Subject matter can be placed in-world in slideshows, text, displays, video and note-cards inside objects or spoken via voice files or text by NPCs. The tokens earned can then be redeemed to purchase special in world items, thus motivating the student to participate further. Added exploration, such as finding other freebies and surprises as you explore, (in the moon base example, finding aliens, avoiding spaceships etc), and interacting all add to the motivational factor.

Being supervised if the student is younger also aids in reducing the complexity of having to learn the tools. For the actual project and pilot, those choosing to participate with no prior virtual world experience will need to prepare in advance or be willing to have an online virtual meeting within the world to gain the one to one support needed for beginners and be directed to the vast resources available from other educators and world owners from around the OpenSim community.

Virtual worlds allow for  synchronous and asynchronous learning activities as demonstrated by Dr. Kay McLennon through the Educators Commons and the Open Simulator Community Conference (OSCC), which I hope to demonstrate in the Best Practices discussion by engaging with those who participate. The Best Practices discussion is a first step in the process when introducing the environment or its potential to educators. This can be done through voice or text and once the technological aspect is learned the participants can then explore independently.

The pilot is built in the virtual world using opensource objects not for commercial use and open source scripts not for commercial use. Also used is objects built from scratch by me, and a few objects built by a 9 year old. Objects built in the virtual word can be used for commercial use and even sold for virtual money to be used in the open sim community or actual money. For these purposes I have chosen to keep my creations CC (Creative Commons) BA (Attribution) NC (Non Commercial)SA (Share Alike) Discussing choices like this and educating the participants is an example of some of the topics that can be discussed in the Best Practices discussion. Prepared slide shows on various example topics can be placed in-world and used as needed depending on the participants interests.

The Space maze is a simple game where you enter a maze of moving stars, navigate to quizzes to win cool space themed prizes, stop along the way for a dance party, find aliens, avoid spaceships, take a 3d photo of yourself, and other surprises. At the end of the maze players will find space craft rides, obstacle courses and scavenger hunts for more aliens. The avatars used in game play are able to be customized and with the space theme you can win space suits and accessories to further customize your avatar. You can even become an alien or robot with other space themed avatars as prizes. These rewards can be won through short quizzes or trivia. An example of an adapted open source quiz/trivia script is provided. Video walk through of the area will also be provided for independent viewing. It can be visited online in Kitely as it is an open world by opening a compatible viewer and entering the world through the website https://www.kitely.com/virtual-world/Salie-Davis/Multiverse-Masters . Though the Space Math Maze and quiz boards are currently set up with math questions it can be tailored for general trivia or any subject matter, or just for fun.

The benefit of interactive virtual world learning is situated cognition, simply stated that knowing is not able to be separated from doing. One theory I connect this with is the concept and application of backwards design in education. Backwards design is goal driven learning, essentially project based learning where you have a final goal in mind. In backwards design you start with the end result, the goal, and then explain to the participants the steps they need to take to achieve this goal. This is in line with gamification and game-based learning and can be used as a motivational tool that will bring them a personal sense of achievement and deeper understanding of the value of knowledge in accomplishing a goal. Research has shown that “…games show higher learning gains than simulations…” (Merchant et al 2014).

Cognitive learning that is interdisciplinary and project based can also enhance the engagement of participants. “The assumption underlying the rapid rise in the use of desktop-based virtual reality technology in instruction is the unique affordance that it offers in enhancing learners’ cognitive skills” (Merchant et al (2014). Beyond simply teaching a subject, through immersion experiences applicable concepts are learned that deepen understanding. Students experience situated learning when they learn through actual application of skills to achieve the set goals. It is more than just having a full understanding of the material presented in the discussion; it also requires knowing the techniques needed to apply the concepts in their own designs. The reason project based learning is effective in the cognitive modeling process is that the learner is able to see the end goal and then through the process of and steps presented in order to create the project, the student comes to a cognitive understanding of how the knowledge learned is applied in a real world scenario. The reason this works is because each project can be tailored to the learning level of the audience in order to teach the learning standards required for their level.  With online virtual world customization, the benefit exists to tailor the world for specific participant needs.

During the event, the primary gauge of successful implementation will be the questions and answer session’s level of participation. This is observational evaluation by the presenter. After the event feedback or return visits from participants to explore the content discussed can be monitored and evaluated. The event can be recorded through the use of screencastomatic or Zoom with the permission of participants for individual evaluation of content effectiveness or sharing on social media to expand the reach of the content and goals. Contact information and follow up surveys can be provided to encourage self evaluation, for example asking the participant if they were able to apply the concepts and best practices discussed to their own projects. It is also possible to “poll” participants through messaging them via the kitely messaging system. Reaching out to participants for feedback will help determine if they were able to navigate the virtual world and find all the resources available when visiting before or after the discussion, and if the signage and NPC directions were adequately designed to guide participants to the different areas. Separate tracking monitors will show which areas of the virtual world is most visited. This will help determine if the majority of visitors prefer the educators resources, the gaming environment or the sandbox area. Three separate message devices, two drop boxes for “mail” and one for text message recording will allow for feedback from participants and also signify which areas attract the most participants.

The Best Practices discussion will serve as an overview for educators who have not yet considered the use of virtual worlds for educational games. The focus will be on expanding the participants knowledge to move beyond the concept of the virtual world as a simulated environment alone, into an interactive game-based space using scripting in objects and gaming concepts to engage students and encourage active learning. I will be using examples in virtual world game play that are designed to instruct the educator on possible uses of the virtual world environment to enrich the learning experience of students. This will incorporate educator resources, examples and game play prototypes. The goal will be to encouraging transactional discussion with a short overview and “Best Practices” and a question and answer session. Independent exploration of resources and the examples will be done before or after the Best Practices discussion at the participants leisure.

The virtual world environment is an under utilized resource by educators in the creation, exploration, and effective use of Game-Based Learning (GBL) in distance and education. The research has shown “… a significant gap between teachers’ perceptions of the importance of integrating technology and their classroom use of these skills.” (p.  111, Carver, 2016) The virtual world can be designed to be an immersive environment requiring movement and social interaction with the instructor and other participants to encourage active learning. The incorporation of games and gamification through prototype exploration and testing will demonstrate the benefit of incorporating game-based learning in higher education to engage students.  Game play in simulated environments encourage active learning in the three step phase of observation, doing and reflection and has proven to be more effective in knowledge retention. Game-based learning activities can create authentic experiences which have been proven to shorten the time requirement and increase the retention of material. Virtual worlds can be designed to create immersive and authentic environments in ways that commercial games can’t.

Educators have the ability to customize the game to better serve student needs. In addition avatar interaction in a three dimensional world increases the level of attentiveness and participant engagement.  Virtual worlds are identified as supporting collaborative learning and social interaction increases productive learning. Research overwhelmingly supports the benefits of learning in immersive virtual worlds for students of all ages. “The contemporary notion of learning environments recognizes that meaningful, active learning takes place in complex, multi-model environments in which the learner plays an active role in constructing knowledge” (p. 2, Dickey, 2010). Research shows that 3D virtual worlds supported “…exploration of identity, community and personal representation.” (p. 3 Dickey, 2010) In addition, though not fully immersive compared to virtual reality rooms and glasses, “… desktop-based 3D virtual environments … (are) shown to enhance learners’ engagement” (Merchant 2014).  “Research has indicated that technology can increase student motivation, attitude, engagement and self-confidence, while improving organization and study skills.” (p. 110, Carver, 2016)

Especially for distance learners in education, the virtual world environment offers a viable solution to facilitate and enhance active participation through game-based learning. The inexpensive solution that virtual environments offer educators is a concept that needs to be explored, understood by participants and then shared with colleagues.

References

Carver, L. B. (2016). Teacher Perception of Barriers and Benefits in K-12 Technology Usage. Turkish Online Journal Of Educational Technology – TOJET, 15(1), 110-116. Retrieved on April 15, 2017, from https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ1086185

Dickey, M. D. (2011). The pragmatics of virtual worlds for K-12 educators: investigating the affordances and constraints of Active Worlds and Second Life with K-12 in-service teachers. Educational Technology Research And Development, (1), 1.  Retrieved on Dec, 2017, from http://eds.a.ebscohost.com.library.esc.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=2&sid=701fa5b8-b55b-4784-9597-e3a821c56084%40sessionmgr4009

McLennan, K.  founder of the Educators Commons. (2017). Help guide for educational virtual open source. OSgrid Wright Plaza. Retrieved on Dec, 2017 from and accessible through Virtual World Viewer at https://OSgrid/region/Wright%20Plaza/207/30/21

McLennan, K. , Opensimulator Conference (2017) Presentation and talk. Dec 10, 2017 at http://conference.opensimulator.org/2017/  Slides accessible at https://tulane.app.box.com/s/hev3iverk9zcs7jiooa5fcbhyet4pxoi

Marie, Evie, Virtual World Survival Guide, (2016) retrieved from, http://inspiration-island.com/educational-projects/virtual-world-survival-guide/

Merchant, Z., Goetz, E. T., Cifuentes, L., Keeney-Kennicutt, W., & Davis, T. J. (2014). Effectiveness of virtual reality-based instruction on students’ learning outcomes in K-12 and higher education: A meta-analysis. Computers & Education, 7029-40. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2013.07.033. Retrieved on Dec, 2017, from http://resolver.ebscohost.com.library.esc.edu/openurl?sid=EBSCO%3aedselp&genre=article&issn=03601315&ISBN=&volume=70&issue=&date=20140101&spage=29&pages=29-40&title=Computers+&atitle=Effectiveness+of+virtual+reality-based+instruction+on+students%27+learning+outcomes+in+K-12+and+higher+education%3a+A+meta-analysis&aulast=Merchant%2c+Zahira&id=DOI%3a10.1016%2fj.compedu.2013.07.033&site=ftf-live

Game Play Example provided as an online resource.

The second presentation and live discussion segment.

 

 

 

Game theory, elements and design for ClassCraft analysis

Classcraft also has many platforms that it can be used on. I used this on my PC. Classcraft is a gamification app. Instead of a game platform it adds game features to real life activities. It has clearly define rules that can be customized by the teacher with video game features like customization of avatars, powers that are symbolic with real life reward, challenges and tasks with real life consequences, and a game themed story line implementing story telling through random events and goals created by the teacher. Classcraft is also able to be customized with villains and random events to add excitement. The avatars can gain and lose points and level up. The can compete on an individual level and as a team.

Classcraft uses scaffolding to move students from one level of knowledge to the next through class based goals, such as helping another student, or passing in homework on time, or fulfilling an academic goal, by rewarding them with experience points that help them level up. When challenges are not met then students can lose health points. In the paid version of the game you can award gold pieces. This is based on Extrinsic Motivation in game theory.When a student levels up they gain “powers” which essentially is a real life privilege determined by the teacher. Each small goal achieved adds up to larger and larger rewards. In this scaffolding is achieved. The Self Determination Theory is applied in the ability to customize the students avatar, giving them a sense of autonomy and control. Because the teacher can customize the goals and activities they can make them achievable and challenge the student encouraging success and competency. In addition students can work together on teams which connects the students to one another thus achieving this goal in the self determination theory.

Because all the activities are based on real life performance throughout the academic year. This achieves Distributed Learning/Spaced Practice. The rewards, privileges, team goals and penalties are continued and spaced rather than a being centered on one specific win/lose goal. The rewards are based on measured achievements rather than completion achievements. Testing/Spaced Retrieval is achieved through repeat rewards or consequences based on specific goals, behaviors and events determined by the teacher. The game does feature set goals and suggestions for activities, challenges, rewards and consequences that can be used, changed or adapted for ease of implementation.

The camaraderie of the team environment helps achieve Episodic Memory. The game enhances this by creating random events. These are fun or challenging story based events that can be randomly generated with surprise goals and consequences, one example being that a specific person, team or the whole class has to talk like a pirate for the day.

Game based dynamics need to be implemented by the teacher using real life activities. IE if the teacher wanted to implement Race and escape they would need to design it into the class craft program through a random event or a team/individual goal/challenge. Collecting, acquiring, and allocating resources is achieved during team play. If a team member falls in battle due to to many HP losses, there are consequences for the whole team. This can be prevented through the allocation of resources and powers that can rescue team mates, restore their HP and otherwise share goals to achieve success. In order to be able to rescue team mates, the individual players need to collect experience points themselves or acquire gold pieces to better protect the team as a whole. This also allows Strategy among team players who choose or are assigned different rolls such as Warrior, Healer, or Mage each with different level up powers to aid in the success of the team. By sharing HP or using powers, hence reducing resources the individual and team must decide if the trade offs or beneficial for the team and for the individuals. This also adds elements of Conflict, Cooperation, and Competition.

This gamification app has limited Constructing and creating in the avatar designs unless you purchase the full version. Other aspects of Constructing and creating would need to be built into the course by the teacher and the Classcraft used to enhance the activity. Over all Classcraft has Goals, Rules, and Objectives that are shared with students and parents and built into the app as well as allowing for customization features used by the teacher.

Multiverse Dragon Masters Evaluation of the Pilot Course

Multiverse Dragon Masters for Elementary Reading Literacy:

Evaluation of the Pilot Course

Salie Davis

Designing Online Learning Environments

(2017SP1-EDU-681103-01)

Professor Mark Lewis

Empire State College

April 28, 2017

Multiverse Dragon Masters, Evaluation:

Multiverse Dragon Masters is a 3d simulation and game based curriculum based in a virtually immersive learning environment. The pilot was designed for age groups with flexibility based on student level and ability, between 6-11 years olds (primary grades) for goal based learning. In addition the primary evaluation form was goal based evaluation (McNamara, 2008). This could be expanded to 12-15 (secondary grades) with evolving curriculum and for advance application with design tools for in world storybook and literary project creation. The pilot was tested by my two daughters, one age 9, and the other an adult home educator of preschool children, as well as two college associates.

My educational goals were to design projects and experiences that are personal and relevant to the learner. My 9 year old daughter whom is home instructed, is below her reading level for her age. The design of this pilot was with her special needs in mind, as well as to produce quality presentations through the use of technology that can be shared with the online community.

On both the website and in the virtual world graphics and text combine to increase the impact on learning. Using this principle the fact that the animation in virtual worlds is more engaging to children in an e-learning environment that a static text based or even interactive chat based website is supported(Clark & Mayer, 2016, p. 71) This is also based on the arousal that emotional attachment promotes learning. The virtual world environment allows for both synchronous and asynchronous learning, where the student can interact with the lesson plan independently or with the instructor, parent and/or other participants. One college associate commented that the title of “Multiverse Dragon Masters” created psychological engagement even before beginning the pilot project.

The supporting website also give additional asynchronous learning opportunities and lesson plan preparation. It allows for the application of the embodiment principle because the avatar programming mimics human gestures in line with live voice interactions, increasing stimulation contributing to learning (Clark & Mayer, 2016, p. 192). Virtual worlds can be individually designed to better adhere to the concurrency principle by avoiding streaming audio, music and ambient noises and using sounds only when beneficial for motivational engagement with the learning content. The individual avatar controls also allow for the content user to adjust sounds, movements and other features to align with personal preferences. In this the user can choose to eliminate ambient noise, sound effects, streaming music, etc. In a virtual world the importance of immersion is highlighted. It is a very specific platform with many possibilities but may not be appropriate for all learners. Deciding on an appropriate audience and content rating will also be essential in its development.

The redundancy principle is supported with this reduction in unnecessary audio when using visual text as the audio may reduce the knowledge absorbed from the lesson (Clark & Mayer, 2016, p. 139). Choosing only beneficial graphics and limiting the over use of graphic, as well as keeping word choice simple and concise are all conducive to learning according to the coherence principle (Clark & Mayer, 2016, p. 165) I can apply the contiguity principle in the virtual world environment by creating corresponding printed words with graphics or slide show with images and words, similar to an online storyboard. Points, tokes, prizes and awards through exploration, games and quizzes will instructors and parent gauge the success of the leaning platform.

Through my research one concern was that the personalizeation features in virtual worlds my become more of a distraction to learners and ultimately outweigh the educational benefits. (p.12, Dickey 2010) Allowing the 9 year old participant to make choices based upon limited selection, rather than teaching the technology tools of actual avatar design, I found that the pilot student was not distracted in the same way described by teachers in prior studies. In addition Personalization Principle, points out the benefits of these features in motivating students (Clark and Mayer, 2016). My adult daughter did report spending time working on her avatar and struggling with the technology aspect, in other words, she wanted to completely personalize her avatar but did not have the time to learn the technology. I ended up spending a few hours with her just to help her get her avatars appearance “just right”. With the two other college associates, I provided a ready made avatar and offered the options to adjust. I found with an avatar that was not “their own” they did not use the personalization features and simply continues with the lesson plan as laid out in the virtual world.

In this lesson plan the goal was to create a virtual world that encouraged reading in a game based environment. While working one on one with the 9 year old student she was motivated to read the story boards and read the quizzes for the opportunity to earn items she could then create her own story book scenes with. She enjoyed the idea of taking pictures of her creations with her own avatar as the main character. The one on one interaction in an online virtual world enhanced her motivation and interests in participating in reading chat and other required readings within the virtual platform in order to participate as she explored different areas and progressed through the game, learning to correctly identify words, and read simple to more advanced sentences throughout the virtual experience. The student was very interested in earning her own space to design in the virtual world, and kept asking me when I would be putting in more rewards, challenges and traps.

For this pilot program I planned a 30 minute walk through with 30 minutes of individual exploration. I had intended this to simulate the one on one goal of instruction. The college associate participants and myself were unable to coordinate schedules to meet online for this walk through. This impacted and lessened the affect of the pilot. Though I offered resources to aid in understanding the technology platform, time was a barrier and these resources were not utilized due to the learners time constraints. Instead I relied on the website resource and written support as an overall presentation of the game features and curriculum.

My adult daughter was able to meet with me one on one and this made her transition to a new technology format easier, thus enabling individual exploration. I will be creating an individualized pdf with visual screen shots as an improvement to the course as well as more training resources for new avatars within the virtual world. This will include a virtual orientation center that will teach movement controls and other aspects of the technology needed for success.

A parent teacher guide is also useful and I was able to implement many of these concepts into the starting point in the virtual world. Having these resources in world is essential and I will be developing PDFs of the same resources when applicable that specifically address subject matter concerning virtual worlds and the educational use of them for children on the companion website. Other parent guides resources include the user agreement both in world and on the website explaining the open access of virtual worlds and the responsibility of the parent and educator to supervise the sue of the virtual world. Help documentation such as how to create a child avatar and other useful tips and directions will also be available.

The subject content used in this virtual pilot began with reading and comprehension. In addition to reading literacy, digital literacy is also expanded though not a direct part of the lesson plan. Through observation I have seen improvement in the 9 year old student with technology use and in vocabulary recognition. The lack of technology skills with this new platform did surface as a barrier more so with the adult learners that the child learner in this pilot course. This supports the research that compared to the often problematic adaptation to new technologies experience by adults, children “…easily adapt to graphic and conceptual abstraction…often have extensive experience in navigating 3D spaces and discovering and exercising interface affordances” (p. 1 Roussou).

I was able to design the world then export it to a private server which is ideal for individual families who need added security and have privacy and safety concerns with online access. I then started from scratch, rebuilding the aspects I found most useful and continue with my experimentation in the online version. I have been exploring Sim on a Stick or “Simonastic” and other ready made servers such as Dreamworld and virtual world venues that do not require internet connections. Eventually I may want to move to a stand-alone platform such as can be found at www.Simonastick.com . In the future I can design and distribute an Oar file for download as an open source educational resource.

As an educator, creating a help sheet to assist learners in finding and setting controls for security and privacy would also be appropriate. This can be done real-time through virtual sessions using video, audio, or text. It can be done through the creation of PDFs that also have accessibility features built in, or it can be done by instructional video. Though the videos I have on my companion website were not specific to the pilot in terms of orientation, the college associate participants commented that the found the videos which addressed the ethics of using online virtual worlds with youth, aided them in their comfort level in taking the pilot course.

Through the first phase of this lesson plan students were able to explore the island, collect items for points, and take quizzes that rewarded for correct answers. The collection of “butterflies” awarded tokens and were accompanied by a notecard that provided instructions. The college associate participants expressed confusion at how to collect these tokens even with the written instructions. My adult daughter and 9 year old daughter benefited from a one on one demonstration. This reinforces the benefit of video tutorials in future designs. Story boards introduced the students to an underlying story plot. Students were also be able to create their own story line using screen shots, adding text and future participants could creating their own story boards that could be placed in world. Though these instructions were in world the college associate participants responded better to the pdf outline on the accompanying website than the in world resources. This identified that though students may find the virtual world a sufficient platform for information, the website and more traditional forms of content delivery may be essential for parent and teacher support. Students and parents can access the lesson plan online, again with parent supervision, will find resources and information will be presented on my current website Wopoli.com and eventually the option of my Facebook page. Future exploration of programs will also allow for quizzes to be saved or even emailed to the instructor. According to quality standards creating additional resources such as a netiquette guide (Quality Matters, 2014).

Resources

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Clark, R., and Mayer, R. (2016) e-Learning and the Science of Instruction. John Wiley, and Sons Inc., Hoboken, N.J.

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Poskurich, George M. (2015). Rapid Intructional Design. Wiley publications

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