What can you use virtual worlds, the metaverse, and the multiverse for?

I recently gave a presentation for corporate trainers on the benefits of virtual worlds, the multiverse, and the metaverse. It was a long session but here is the clip of my 30 minutes. https://lnkd.in/ghJDrEzx

Social skills coaching example, understanding body language.

Social skills coaching example, understanding body language.

Chatbot and AI database examples for social skills and conversation.

Quiz examples with question and answer scripts.

Training room examples for basic in world skills, how to move, communicate use camera controls, etc.

Gamification example with points and rewards using a nutrition theme.

Medical scene example for role-playing and simulations.

Classroom set-up examples with audio, video, and interactive text presentations as well as working classroom computers for browsing the web.

Laboratory scene showing many free open-source resources available. (most scenes include all open-source and free materials.

Navigation examples with teleports and signage.

Resources for people new to the virtual world.

Eileen O’Connor is a college professor at SUNY Empire State College in science and technology teacher education, focusing on emerging technologies including virtual worlds & web tools for learning. She began as a chemist, moved to IBM in the 1980s, then went into education in science and technology.

Picture of youtube videos by Eileen O’Connor

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCABDz8mCBgnRQwzvKTcA3TA

Picture of Slideshares by Eileen O’Connor

https://www.slideshare.net/eoconnor/presentations

Salie Davis works as a recruiter for a global company preparing remote workers for a successful career. She has a Master’s degree in learning in emerging technologies focused on the benefits of virtual worlds for immersive training with a graduate certificate in teaching in emerging technologies. Her work experience includes twenty years working with home school organizations, and private schools, and presenting at global conferences for adult learners and professionals.

Picture of youtube videos for Saliecmt

https://www.youtube.com/user/saliecmt/videos

Picture of multiversemasters.blogspot.com

http://multiversemasters.blogspot.com/

picture of MultiverseMasters WordPress

https://multiversemasters.wordpress.com/category/resources/

Picture of Wopoli.com

https://wopoli.com/category/emerging-technologies/

The Art of Cultural Communicaton

Challenges our Leaders Face in the Global Work Community

I was born in a rural town in the northern most part of Maine. I had little cultural awareness as our small town culture was set in its ways, and a good 30 years behind the rest of the country. I knew even less about global culture. Even though Canada was a short drive away, my first impression of that countries culture was my parents telling me to go outside on the weekends until it was time for meals, but not to journey too far into the woods, as I may never come out of them and end up in Canada speaking French.

Now I recruit future team members across all of North America, and have had the privilege to travel the entire expanse of the eastern seaboard working with people across the globe in education and employment. I have valued the many roles I have held in my career with Sitel Group,working from home for over a decade. Sitel Group “employs 160,000 employees across locations in 40 countries, serving 700+ customers in 50+ languages” according to the companies site. That is a statistic that I proudly declare to future employees. It is an amazing feat, to say the least.

I first discovered the need for cultural awareness while working with clients in the US that hired employees from across the continent. These teams were virtually organized and managed. Early on we did phone interviews, and had meetings through teleconferences. I remember one meeting in particular, where our leaders were venting frustrations concerning the written responses phone agents would send to them when they were being supported in chat rooms, and when they spoke to these agents on the phone. The leaders felt these responses were disrespectful, and had decided that the agents who were using this type of communication would receive written disciplinary action. When I heard what the written and verbal offenses were, I had no choice but to intercede.

The agents were referring to the supervisors by their first names, which was standard procedure at the time, however, they were using Mr. and Ms. prior to the first name, such as Ms. Barb, or Mr. John. The leaders were certain they were being mocked because as soon as they would tell one person to use the first name only, later that day or week, someone else would refer to them in the same manner. They felt that this was a serious offense at the level of group organized insubordination, and demanded support in their corrective action plans to discipline the offending employees.

At this time, a majority of our leadership was from the Northern U.S. Hemisphere. We had recently expanded and a large portion of new hires were from Southern U.S. states that we had expanded into. My trips to Miami, and the Florida Keys came in handy in ways I could not have imagined. I remember by first encounter with this cultural trend. A friend and business associate giving us a tour of his business had employees who kept calling him Mr. Monty. I looked at him with such oblivious confusion he had to laugh when in a puzzled voice I asked if the people he was working with knew his last name. He explained to me that in this southern culture they were showing their respect acknowledging his authority by using his first name with a prefix.

Our leaders were about to take disciplinary action against agents for showing them respect.

Should we have then educated the agents, that their way of showing respect was wrong. Should we have enforced that they do it our way, simply because we were the leadership? After all wouldn’t this eliminate future cultural misunderstandings?

Becoming culturally aware in the global and virtual work force is not about standardizing our corporate cultures. This is the first mistake often made and best avoided. Cultural identity is what makes a global company strong. Rather than standardizing our culture, we can incorporate an understanding of what makes us different and acknowledge how those differences give us the competitive edge in the global market. We can do this by understanding how our cultural identity may interfere with communications that are coming from a different cultural identity than our own.

My experience working with a team in the Philippines exemplifies our need to expand our acceptance of differences in written structure and cultural idioms. Working in a combine chat between American leaders and leaders from teams in the Philippines, the habit of team members to be social in the work environment, joking with each other and poking “harmless” fun at our selves and our teams, created a rift that again quickly escalated to the head of the Philippines team wanting to take disciplinary action against the American team members for insubordination. In this situation I was unable to make my observations known as I was at a lower hierarchical level than the Philippines leader. Any observation I made during the meeting would be seen as further disrespect. Instead I called my supervisor into a meeting, explained the cultural issue and he, being equal to the leader in the Philippines was then able to have a private conversation and properly apologize for the misunderstanding. We did not demand that the Philippines team “lighten up”, we did however move our social and jovial team building discussions to a separate format to improve communications with the Philippines team members. We respected their cultural identity for a serious work environment and were even able to invite them to events designed to be specifically social in nature where they could be more relaxed and participate in social group activities.

Even common idioms can cause cultural rifts in team communications. One Operations Management meeting was cut short when one of the leaders from a brick and mortar complex stated they had to leave early in order to “put out some fires”. The Philippines team reacted with genuine concern for the safety of our employees, thinking that the building itself was on fire. This brought about jovial laughter from the American team and further insult to the Philippines team. They went silent and the meeting became non-productive. Due to our insensitivity and unintentional blindness to the cultural identity team members from this other culture valued, this also required follow up meetings to alleviate the damage caused.

My last example, I have learned while working with my Canadian team. Due to the benefits that working from home brings to future employees, we have had the opportunity to tap into human resources from many different cultures and areas, both locally and with immigrant populations. North America is constantly evolving as people from all over the global community settle here and seek to join our work force. Something as simple as differences in accents can manifest itself as a barrier preventing qualified people from promotions or hindering support, even preventing qualified candidates success at the hiring stage. This is due to our unintentional bias and cultural tendency to favor people whose mannerism and speech is similar to ours. Holding employees to correct grammar, pronunciation, and vocabulary, when not directly related to job requirements is culturally insensitive.

We are the leading standard for excellence in Business Process Outsourcing for both Work from Home and as a global corporate community. Learning about other cultures so that we do not project our values onto other individuals on our team is essential to the development of a healthy global corporate community. Culturally diverse teams are often more innovative and offer creative results that benefit the team as a whole. Our goal should be to create a culturally diverse and inclusive work environment through understanding and cultural awareness. This is the art of cultural communication and challenges our leaders face in the global work community.

About the author:

Salie Davis has worked as a virtual employee for over a decade with Sitel Group under Legacy Sykes. Starting as an agent she has served in many roles, working with many diversified teams and clients.

She has three degrees earned through distance learning with active contributions to the global educational community and has shared her creative and written talents through virtual conferences and global communities.

Creation of a picture book lesson plan with; PDF format, power point, spreadsheet, and word document resources, as well as three video resources.

The above video gives an overview for teachers and parents

This is the story book read by the author for younger children

This is just the pages to be paused and read individually

Gods little story book about art creation teachers edition in PowerPoint 

You may adapt the PowerPoint for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

final project creation picture book lesson plan word document Salie Davis

You may adapt the document for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

gods little story book about art creation student edition in PDF

You may adapt the PDF for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

Gods little story book about art creation student edition in PowerPoint

You may adapt the PowerPoint for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

Gods little story book about art creation teachers edition in PDFfinal-project-creation-picture-book-lesson-plan-salie-davis

You may adapt the PDF for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

grading sheet for the picture book in spreadsheet format

You may adapt the grading sheet for your own use but may not distribute any adapted information without written  consent from the author and you must give proper credit to the author

Literacy Guide

INTRODUCTION TO LITERACY:

Transliteracy overcomes the debate around traditional literacy versus digital literacy to include all communication types. “Several competing concepts of literacy have emerged including digital literacy, media literacy, visual literacy, and information technology fluency, but there is a need for a comprehensive framework based on essential information proficiencies and knowledge. New media literacy and transliteracy have also responded to the rapid and ongoing changes in technology. As part of a metaliteracy reframing, we argue that producing and sharing information are critical activities in participatory Web 2.0 environments” ( Mackey and Jacobson, P. 1) Whether you use the terms transliteracy, information literacy, media literacy, digital literacy, or metaliteracy; the terminology seems burgeoning but the concepts are the same. We need to be a literate society in whatever communication device we are using.  One thing that has changed in our culture is that in education it is no long “answer the question” it is now “question the answer”!  The challenge exists now for educators on what forms of literacy to focus on in order for students to know how to use the tools in order to aquire the knowledge they need for any specified subject. Literacy is not about just reading and writing anymore. Listed below are important literacies for middle school students.

TRADITIONAL LITERACY:

Traditional Literacy is reading and writing.  By middle school this is a case by case issue, however reading and writing in the digital age is less centered on paper bound books or pencil/pen and paper.

INFORMATION LITERACY:

Typing and Text Creation

Being able to type proficiently on a keyboard is essential. Even keyboards however are becoming outdated. Students should also be aware of touch screens, and know how to access various digital menus in order to navigate different forms of text production in the digital age. Document creation in various formats and with various programs will be needed. Examples of this are the difference between using notes programs and document programs regarding formatting options. The basics of formatting and saving a document are sufficient at this level.

Visual and Audial Creation

Being able to create presentations using audio and visual applications are important. This may be as simple as using a devices microphone to create an audio file, slide presentation programs or webcams for videos.

Tool Literacy

One example of tools is the calculator. Calculators come in many forms in our digital culture and are more often found on computer screens, tablet screens and phones. Unless students are in an educational or business setting hand held devices dedicated solely to calculations are not used.  A basic understanding of spreadsheet operations, gathering and measuring data, graphs, charts, and formulas for creating graphing visuals is also important. Beyond just saving information in files on a computer, students must be able to know how to capture information that is not downloadable. An example of this is a snipping tool, or screen capture video program. Because tools are always changing I won’t try to create an all-inclusive list here.

Accessing Digital Data

Effective search methods on digital devices will need to be taught. This not only includes how to access text online or on devices, or web pages, but also visual and audio access. Students need to know how to access, podcasts, informational videos, and how to navigate them on various devices.

Navigation

Knowing how to access and navigate EBooks, educational websites, online libraries and databases will be important for students when reading and researching text in the digital age. Adaptions for audio presentation, enlarging text on the screen and other accessibility options is also beneficial to address.

Evaluating digital data

Evaluation of websites and digital information is crucial for students to determine the difference between factual information, scientific theory, opinion, propaganda, and falsehood.

Citing Sources and understanding copyright

Knowing where to find citation information and accepted forms for citation is helpful for students in the evaluation of material, and presentation of research. Understanding copyrights and creative commons is beneficial well collecting, presenting and sharing digital data.

Collaboration

Collaboration tools like online documents, chat boards, video or telephonic conferencing, mind maps and other cooperative tools can be introduced with the benefits of education and future work or interest collaboration as examples.

Safety Online

Being able to identify and protect one’s self against phishing activities, bulling, and information theft and privacy issues online is essential.

Netiquette

Online communication rules and cultural norms for politeness and appropriate behavior should be taught and enforced.

Culture: Media Convergence and Networked Participation

Culture: Media Convergence and Networked Participation

Salie Davis

I have a particular interest in open source and creative commons licensing. The book, Culture: Media Convergence and Networked Participation talks about the term “Publics” as being a shared culture. This culture operates outside of economics. The current capitalistic culture, once based on rewards and economic gain through contribution and hard work, has disintegrated from a three class step society, two a two class have and have nots of varying degrees.  With the increased technology making participation more accessible, the lower classes struggle against economic barriers by attempting to educate and assist the common culture through these technologies.  “Publics can be reactors, (re)makers and (re)distributors, engaging in shared culture and knowledge through discourse and social exchange as well as through acts of media reception” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 3) This works in today’s culture due to the ability to pool from a larger geography of participants.

With technology advancement, much like the evolution of the printing press and eventual media industry, Governments and top level economic status, work to create structural barriers to limit the commons exchange of thoughts and ideas in order to maintain control over the populations. One example of this is the limit on cross border internet communications. This is not only through country barriers but even region barriers within countries. For example the United States has the New England region and the South Eastern, etc.  This means when shopping online the individual is limited to options by region which essentially limits the individuals’ choices.

According to the text however, “Yochai Benkler sees these decentralized networks of communication and exchange as major catalysts of the shift to a networked information economy that is displacing the industrial information economy” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 8) This proposal suggests that nonmarket devices will increase through the advancement of media convergence and networked participation. Michael Bauwens also theorizes that human network- based organization may result in individuals “…engaged in the production of common resources, without recourse to monetary compensation as key motivating factor, and not organized according to hierarchical methods of command and control” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 8). This is explained as the networked information economy of which the costs for producing creative applications can be shared over the public space between like-minded participants who can forgo the price system in order to creatively combine their interests to create projects. This results in “…nonmarket sector of information, knowledge, and cultural production…” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 8).

This book does well to incorporate several different possible theories of future change based on the increase of networked participation such as the theories of Bauwens who describes this network as a person to person (P2P) interaction increasing significant social, economic and political exchanges between individuals that would not normally take place. In the same text it is also pointed out that human nature seeks like minds, therefor there is a debate that exists as to whether this P2P interaction truly initiates change or whether it just reinforces currently held beliefs through the increased access to assemble with like minds.

Varnelis keeps the discussion well rounded through the analysis of several different opinions such as Garret Hardin’s “The Tragedy of the Commons,” that considers the norm of the public realm to be individualistic and self-serving, therefor the commons is an unrealistic ideal that cannot come to full fruition or the opinions of Jane Jacobs who states her theories that the public sphere is only minimally social in nature. (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 45). The conclusion that I am able to most relate to is … ” persistent predictions of imminent doom for established content industries, together with fears of corporate litigation and monopolistic forces squelching the emerging common culture, indicate that the future of public culture is still very much up for grabs” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 49). Therefore, the uncertainty and various possible future outcomes that exist as institutional and professional authorities are challenged by networked participation in the social, cultural and political realms. One example of this is the fact that P2P and creative commons sharing “…is new legislation by existing media conglomerates aiming to extend the scope of their copyright and prevent the creation of derivative work” (Varnelis, 2012, Pg. 158). It seems only through active participation can we take an active role in determining the final outcome.

References
Varnelis, K. (2012). Networked Publics. Cambridge, US: The MIT Press. Retrieved from http://www.ebrary.com.library.esc.edu

Educating Youth Via Video

At the Empire State College All College Conference I was fortunate to take the seminar, “Getting to Project Completion”. I was inspired by these concepts and how they aligned with my educational goals to teach project based or goal orientated learning. For adults the concepts and steps that must be learned can be more easily processed when presented via text or lecture than if presented in the same means to a young child.

I also took the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) test in preparation for the seminar “Understanding your personality and how to work with others” Personality types is beneficial to understand when trying to reach a specific learner. Extroversion, introversion, sensing, intuition, thinking, feeling, judging, or perception concerning learning styles can easily be misinterpreted or seen as one being less desirable than the other. In the seminar we were inspired to see the knowledge of personality, or in this application, learning styles, as a tool in development and improvement.

I can imagine my daughter attending the seminar, distracted and unimpressed. Even with encouragement she would not have been able to absorb or retain the information presented. For young children this concept is much more complex and they do not have the prior learning or experience to help reinforce their understanding of these concepts. Finding visual ways to assist in elementary learning has been a studied and proven technique that improves the success rate in the retention of the knowledge presented. Finding ways to connect this knowledge to a child’s experiences and reinforce the learning through repetition to establish long term memory and retention of learning.

Understanding how short term memory evolves into long term memory is beneficial in designing repeated concepts that reinforce effective learning. To transition a new concept into learning the learning module can attach the new knowledge to what is already known creating associations. Through the process of repeat associations and stimulus through sensory registers long term memory is accessed and expanded on

In designing learning modules for youth, in addition to declarative knowledge, which can be accomplished through basic patterns and concepts such as math, procedural knowledge will help the student learn how to apply knowledge to specific tasks. Creating a teaching module that focuses on how to create a goal, for example and how to achieve that goal is project based learning.

Visual learning is considered the most effective means of learning and creating video presentations helps connect the visual with the verbal sensory inputs. Studies have been done with elementary level learners and can be used to help even young learners self-regulate. The video can go through several basic examples using everyday activities as the goal example.  The example video, rather than simply creating a lecture video is a proven successful tool in fostering an open learning environment. Incorporating incentives was also seen as a productive means to reinforce open education.

The learning module can be most effective when it takes the new concepts and connects them to concepts already learned. Creating a goal for a project involves many steps; thinking about why the project is important, helping the learner consider why they should care about the project, what steps are needed to complete the project, and what the project will accomplish.

For younger students to get them used to the new cognitive process of the steps needed for project planning and completion we can engage sensory registers and reinforce the new concept. This new concept begins as a short term memory item. By connecting the abstract concepts of setting a goal to concrete examples we connect the new concept to long term memory associations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

References

Fößl, T. t., Ebner, M. m., Schön, S. s., & Holzinger, A. a. (2016). A Field Study of a Video Supported Seamless-Learning-Setting with Elementary Learners. Journal Of Educational Technology & Society, 19(1), 321-336.

ÖZDEMIR, M. m., & YILDIZ, A. a. (2015). THE EFFECT OF EDUCATIONAL VIDEOS PRESENTED IN TWO DIFFERENT CONTENT STREAM ON MOTIVATION AND ACHIEVEMENT OF STUDENTS WITH VISUAL LEARNING STYLES. (English). Journal Of Theory & Practice In Education (JTPE), 11(1), 104-124.

Sultana, N., Kubra, B., & Khan, U. A. (2015). EFFECT OF VISUAL STYLE-BASED INSTRUCTION ON LEARNERS’ ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT AT ELEMENTARY LEVEL. Gomal University Journal Of Research, 31(2), 146-155.

Teaching art is more than just technique

It is Creativity, Community, and Caring… and so much more

This presentation is an example of how you can make the most out of what you do. I am the art teacher in this presentation. The memories I created and the lessons learned in the minds of the children I taught live on, however through new media and new literacies  technology was used to expand the message. Take the gifts that you have been given to share with the world and use the resource the world has given you to bring them to their fullest potential.

About me

I offer extensive experience managing virtual teams in educational applications as a consultant and in the private sector, as well as in corporate applications. I have worked in the ever-emergent remote workforce for over ten years, as a web author, content creator and as a coach/mentor supporting remote workers in customer care fields. I have volunteered as an academic coach and mentor while earning my degrees at Empire State College via distance and served as the President of the Graduate Student Collaborative, organizing online seminars and meetings that focused on diversity and other relevant topics by organizing in-person and online discussions through the engagement of leaders in these fields, as well as peer groups, in think tank discussions. I have worked as an Operations Management Division Analyst (OMDA) for Sykes, a completely remote position. Prior to this position, I piloted several programs at Sykes, creating procedures and supports in these emerging programs as well as training employees, and creating training manuals and videos. My degrees are in creative marketing, in media communications and learning in emerging technologies, with a graduate certificate in teaching in emerging technologies. These complement my ability to address the specific challenges that learning and teaching through technology interfaces creates. I worked as an educator, teaching art, music and computer for five years at a private school. I designed all the curriculum for these classes. My current studies in learning and teaching in emerging technologies have kept my knowledge of educational applications cutting edge. I am currently a recruiter for Sitel, A global leader in the BPO industry, hiring for the North American work from home division.

I develop curriculum for my autistic daughter and have been working with educational design in virtual worlds. I develop open source curriculum that I provide access to on my blog and websites. I am a founding member of the think tank, the Institute for New Paradigms. One mission of this organization is to serve as consultants to organizations seeking to grow in rich, often technology mediated, forms of learning and communication. I routinely help organize and present at seminars on leadership, emerging technologies and education. I have organized college diversity discussions that bridged students across the state through technology conferencing. I also supported students during a pilot program of an immersive virtual residency conducted by Empire State College.

My education and work experience make me especially adept in working with teams and individuals through distance technology. I worked in the health and human services fields for ten years before switching career paths. These positions included intensive work with special populations of all ages and training in behavioral techniques and communications. My interpersonal communication skills enable me to deliver results in a person focused environment. By proactive analysis, I anticipate needs to provide information, resources and communications. I remain professional and respectful in high stress conflict situations with empathy and diplomacy to provide resolution. This is more challenging in a virtual environment than in one that is face to face. My passion for supporting and motivating people to be the best that they can be. This is what drives me.

Education:

SUNY Empire State College, New York, Master of Arts, Dec 2019

Learning in Emerging Technologies

SUNY Empire State College, New York, Dec 2019

Certificate Teaching in Emerging Technologies

SUNY Empire State College, New York, Bachelor of Arts Degree

Interdisciplinary Studies: Creative Marketing and Media Communications, June 2015

SUNY Empire State College Associate’s Degree

Interdisciplinary Studies: Creative Marketing. June 2011

Certifications:

Down East Horizons

Sign Language Certification, 2003

Care and Comfort

Behavioral Specialist, 2003

Community Health and Human services

Certified Medications Technician, 2002

Residential Councilor, 2001

United Technologies Center

Activities Coordinator, 1998

Mount Desert Island Adult Education

Certified Nursing Assistant, 1995

Presentations (Oral and Poster):

OSCC Challenging Goliath, Bringing Virtual Reality into Higher Education………October 2018

https://youtu.be/hTiOque8GE0

CUNY Games Conference 4.0,  January 2018

https://gamesconf2017.commons.gc.cuny.edu/day-1/

SUNY Student Wellness Retreat, April 2018

https://www.esc.edu/student-affairs/health-wellness/swr/step-by-step/

SUNY poster contest presenter, April 2010

SUNY Undergraduates Shaping New York’s Future: A Showcase of Scholarly Posters

http://www.suny.edu/Files/sunynewsFiles/Pdf/PosterProgram.pdf

Grants Received:

Otter Creek Park and Playground Construction Fund Town of Mount Desert, 1996

Grant awarded for 10,000 dollars to construct a village recreational area

Acadia Christian School art program Garelic Farms, 2014

500 dollar grant from for the purchase of supplies

http://www.garelickfarms.com/promotions/pure-happiness

Institutional Service:

SUNY Graduate Student Collaborative President, 2017-Current

https://sunyescgsc.wordpress.com/executive-board/

Institute for New Paradigms founding member, 2018-Current

https://sites.google.com/site/inpworkinggroup/home/mission

Empire State College tutor, 2010-2012

Telephonic conferences and written communication for distance learners

Created online learning videos

Conducted virtual learning screen share activities

Empire State College CDL Connection student reporter, 2010-2012

Conducted interviews and submitted articles for publication

Community Involvement:

4H V.O.L.T. trained leader, 1996-2011

Co-led 4h groups

Supervised at major 4H event including overnight and extended conferences

Created a pilot initiative for a virtual 4H group

Summer Camp counselor, 2005-2007

Developed and implemented camp activities for photography classes

Supervised and engaged a cabin of 6 girls in daily activities and overnight

Otter Creek Park and Play Ground Project Coordinator,  1997-2002

Responsible for designing a park and a playground

Project coordination and managing construction

Fund raising for 15,000 separate from town grant

Otter Creek Aide Society Director, 1996-2002

Village improvement society serving 1000 plus people

Responsible for running annual village events and holiday celebrations

Management of village owned properties

Town of Mount Desert, 1995-1997

Traffic Safety Committee

Relevant Experience:

Technology

Virtual Reality platforms / Zoom conferencing / Adobe conferencing/ Microsoft Office

OSX software/ Linux open source software/ Windows software/ Adobe Creative Suites

RTM / RTA/WFO/ EWFM /Kronos / Aspect /Avaya /Spark / Skype/Messenger/ Social media platforms and other web based tools.

Content Creation

Home school Instructor all grade levels, 1997-2009 / 2014-2019

Researched, designed and implemented custom curriculum

Alpine Access/Sykes serving high profile clients with a virtual workforce, 2012-2019

Corporate Operation Management Division- America

Productivity team and Technology team

Program support, coaching, training, and supervision

Sales, customer service and support

Acadia Christian School: Art, Music, and Computer Science teacher all grade levels, 2009-2014

Supported the program through solicited donations and supplies

Researched, designed and implemented custom curriculum

Wrote and designed curriculum and Art book

Web Content Writer and Photographer for acadianationalpark.com, 2010

Travel and leisure article and photography

Acadian Otter Corporate Manager, 2003-2010

Oversaw marketing and operations of rental and land management

Down East Horizons, Residential Specialist and Job Coach, 2002-2003

In home care and training of combative adults with physical and mental disabilities

Sign language communication

Facility care, job training and coaching for developmentally challenged adults

Care and Comfort Behavioral Specialist 1, 2002-2003

Home based intervention of emotionally challenged children

C.H.C.S. Residential Councilor and In-service trainer, 1999-2002

Supervision and life counseling of 6 teenage high risk youth

Bar Harbor Times, Otter Creek Correspondent, 1994-1999

Weekly village news article/editorial

Sonogee Rehabilitation and Living Center, Activities Director and In-service trainer, 1997-2000

Management of 36 patients afflicted by Dementia and staff training

SalieDavis